Diddy Drake Guns N Roses Forbes HighestPaid Musicians Of 2017

first_img Twitter News Diddy, Drake, Guns N’ Roses: Forbes’ Highest-Paid Musicians Of 2017 Facebook Who Made Forbes’ 2017 Highest-Paid List? diddy-drake-guns-n-roses-forbes-highest-paid-musicians-2017center_img Who’s getting paid and then some? Check out the full top 10 list of highest-paid musicians courtesy of ForbesTim McPhateGRAMMYs Dec 8, 2017 – 8:09 am “Success doesn’t just end up on your lap. You have to work, work, work, and work some more.” Wise words from Sean “Diddy” Combs,” who personally knows a thing or two about working hard and positive results. The GRAMMY-winning mogul has worked his way to the top of many a mountain, including a new one: the top of Forbes’ top 10 list of highest-paid musicians in 2017. Diddy parlayed a Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour, a Cîroc vodka deal and the sale of 33 percent of his Sean John clothing line to pull in a cool $130 million.”I started looking at business at the age of 12, [from] delivering newspapers to working in gas station bathrooms, or even doing things like being a background dancer or a stylist,” Diddy told Forbes earlier this year. “Whatever I could do to get close to the industry.”Beyoncé placed second on the list with $105 million, driven by her successful Queen Bey Formation World Tour. Drake landed the No. 3 spot with $94 million, driven by his successful Boy Meets World Tour.Forbes’ list was based on pretax income earned between June 1, 2016, and June 1, 2017, with data collected from Nielsen SoundScan, Pollstar, the RIAA and interviews with industry insiders. View the entire list below.1. Diddy: $130 million2. Beyoncé: $105 million3. Drake: $94 million4. The Weeknd: $92 million5. Coldplay: $88 million6. Guns N’ Roses: $84 million7. Justin Bieber: $83.5 million8. Bruce Springsteen: $75 million9. Adele: $69 million10. Metallica: $66.5 millionApple Reveals Top Albums Of 2017 Email Read morelast_img read more

Tax secrets of global elite exposed

first_imgCanadian prime minister Justin Trudeau (L) and Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II (R). File photoUS commerce secretary Wilbur Ross has business ties to a shipping firm linked to Vladimir Putin’s inner circle, according to a vast leak of financial documents that also revealed Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II’s investments in tax havens.It was also revealed that Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau’s top fundraiser and senior advisor Stephen Bronfman, heir to the Seagram fortune, moved some $60 million to offshore tax havens with ex-senator Leo Kolber.The findings have emerged as part of the Paradise Papers released by the US-based International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), which was behind the Panama Papers made public last year.There is no suggestion that Ross, Bronfman or the queen’s private estate acted illegally.But Ross’s ties to Russian entities raise questions over potential conflicts of interest, and whether they undermine Washington’s sanctions on Moscow.The revelations about Bronfman could spell trouble for Trudeau, who was elected two years ago riding on the coattails of promises to reduce economic inequality and tax avoidance.In the case of Queen Elizabeth’s private estate, critics may question whether it is appropriate for the British head of state to invest in offshore tax havens.Putin’s son-in-lawRoss, a billionaire investor, holds a 31 percent stake in Navigator Holdings through a complex web of offshore investments detailed in the documents examined by nearly 100 news organizations as part of an international collaboration.The 79-year-old reduced his stake when he took public office, according to public filings.Navigator Holdings runs a lucrative partnership with Russian energy giant Sibur, which is partially owned by Putin’s son-in-law Kirill Shamalov and Gennady Timchenko, the Russian president’s friend and business partner who is subject to US sanctions.The US imposed sanctions on Russian entities and individuals following its annexation of Crimea and aggression in Ukraine.Ross’s private equity firm has been the biggest shareholder in Navigator.His personal share of the firm’s stake was reduced when he took office in February, but the commerce chief’s investment is still valued at between $2 million to $10 million, according to his security filings and government ethics disclosure.The New York Times reported that Ross’s stake in Navigator has been held by companies in the Cayman Islands. His wealth, estimated to exceed $2 billion, is said to be tied to similar arrangements in various tax havens like the Cayman Islands.“Secretary Ross was not involved with Navigator’s decision to engage in business with Sibur, a publicly traded company, which was not under sanction at the time and is not currently,” said James Rockas, a Commerce Department spokesman.“Moreover, Secretary Ross has never met the Sibur shareholders referenced in this story and, until now, did not know of their relationship.”Controversial businessesThe documents also show around £10 million ($13 million) of the Queen’s private money was placed in funds held in the Cayman Islands and Bermuda, first reported in Britain by the BBC and the Guardian newspaper.They reported the funds reinvested the money in an array of businesses, including controversial rent-to-buy retailer BrightHouse, which has been accused of exploiting the poor, and a chain of alcohol stores that later went bankrupt.A spokeswoman for the Duchy of Lancaster, which provides the monarch with an income and handles her investments, said: “All of our investments are fully audited and legitimate.”“We operate a number of investments and a few of these are with overseas funds,” she added.The spokeswoman added that one of the fund investments represents only 0.3 per cent of the total value of the Duchy.The Paradise Papers contain 13.4 million documents mainly from Appleby, an offshore law firm with offices in Bermuda and beyond.The files were first obtained by the German newspaper Suddeutsche Zeitung, and shared with the ICIJ and partner media outlets.last_img read more

Democrats capture US House majority

first_imgAlissa Mauk and her son, Lyric, 8, look on at Democratic US Senator Heidi Heitkamp`s midterm election night party in West Fargo, North Dakota, US on 6 November. Photo: ReutersDemocrats rode a wave of dissatisfaction with president Donald Trump to win control of the US House of Representatives on Tuesday where they will seek to keep his agenda in check and open his administration to intense scrutiny.In midterm elections two years after he won the White House, Trump and his fellow Republicans were set to maintain their majority in the US Senate following a divisive campaign marked by fierce clashes over race, immigration and other cultural issues.With a House majority, Democrats will have the power to investigate Trump’s tax returns and possible conflicts of interest, and challenge his overtures to Saudi Arabia, Russia and North Korea.They also could force Trump to scale back his legislative ambitions, possibly dooming his promises to fund a border wall with Mexico, pass a second major tax-cut package or carry out his hardline policies on trade.S&P equity index futures erased most of their gains on expectations Democrats would seize the House.A simple House majority would be enough to impeach Trump if evidence surfaces that he obstructed justice or that his 2016 campaign colluded with Russia. But Congress could not remove him from office without a conviction by a two-thirds majority in the Republican-controlled Senate.Democrats in the House could be banking on launching an investigation using the results of US special counsel Robert Mueller’s already 18-month-old probe of allegations of Russian interference on Trump’s behalf in the 2016 presidential election. Moscow denies meddling and Trump denies any collusion.Tuesday’s result was a bitter outcome for Trump, a 72-year-old former reality TV star and businessman-turned-politician, after a campaign that became a referendum on his leadership.Down the stretch, Trump hardened his rhetoric on issues that appealed to his conservative core supporters, issuing warnings about a caravan of Latin American migrants headed to the border with Mexico and condemnations of liberal American “mobs.”Democrats turned out in droves to register disapproval of his divisive rhetoric and policies on such issues as immigration and his travel ban targeting several Muslim-majority countries.A record number of women ran for office this election, many of them Democrats turned off by Trump’s policy agenda.The election results mean Democrats will resume House control in January for the first time since the 2010 election, beginning a split-power arrangement with the Republican-led Senate that may force Trump to scale back his legislative ambitions and focus on issues with bipartisan support, such as an infrastructure improvement package or protections against prescription drug price increases.It also will test Trump’s ability to compromise, something he has shown little interest in over the last two years with Republicans controlling both chambers of Congress.The loss of power will test Trump’s political hold on House Republicans, most of whom had pledged their support for him lest they face the wrath of the party’s core supporters, who remain in his corner.Democrats celebrate after gubernatorial candidate Laura Kelly wins against Kris Kobach at her election night party in Topeka, Kansas, US on 6 November. Photo: Reuters Tag: USA, Democrats, Donald Trump, Barac ObamaMost Democratic candidates in tight races stayed away from harsh criticism of Trump during the campaign’s final stretch, focusing instead on bread-and-butter issues like keeping down healthcare costs, maintaining insurance protections for people with pre-existing medical conditions and safeguarding the Social Security retirement and Medicare healthcare programs for senior citizens.The final weeks before the election were marked by the mailing of pipe bombs to his top political rivals, with a political fan of Trump arrested and charged, and the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue in which 11 people died, sparking a debate about Trump’s biting rhetoric and whether it encouraged extremists.In the House, Democrats picked up seats across the map, ousting incumbent Republican Barbara Comstock in suburban Virginia and sending Donna Shalala, a former Cabinet secretary under president Bill Clinton, to the House in south Florida.In the Senate, where Republicans were heavily favored to keep control heading into Tuesday’s voting, Republican Mike Braun captured incumbent Joe Donnelly’s seat in Indiana and Republican Kevin Cramer beat incumbent Democratic senator Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota.Some of the biggest Democratic stars of the campaign season were struggling. Liberal House member Beto O’Rourke became a national sensation with his underdog US Senate campaign but fell short in conservative Texas, and Andrew Gillum was trailing Republican Ron DeSantis in his quest to become the first African-American governor of the key swing state of Florida.Incumbent Democratic senator Joe Manchin won a hotly contested race in conservative West Virginia, and conservative Marsha Blackburn held a Senate seat for Republicans.Senators Bernie Sanders of Vermont, a 2016 Democratic presidential contender, and Tim Kaine of Virginia, Hillary Clinton’s vice presidential nominee in 2016, easily won re-election, news networks projected. Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown was projected to hold his seat in Ohio.All 435 seats in the House, 35 seats in the 100-member Senate and 36 of the 50 state governorships were up for grabs.last_img