Kat Graham Exposes Death And Suffering On Egg Farms In New Video

first_imgActor Kat Graham has teamed up with PETA to reveal the neglect and filthy conditions that hens face on egg farms in a breaking new video exposé.The footage, which was captured by eyewitnesses on three egg farms near Vancouver, shows hens stuck in mounds of feces teeming with maggots and left for dead; others suffering from extensive feather loss, injuries, and illness; and birds forced to live inside cramped cages next to the rotting corpses of their deceased cagemates.“When PETA showed me this video of these poor abused hens, I was so heartbroken,” says The Vampire Diaries star and singer Graham. “And then, I got mad. This cruelty and neglect are commonplace on egg farms all over the world. Please, please help these gentle birds and millions like them — it’s easy. Don’t eat eggs. They’re a product of intense suffering. You can help stop the abuse by going vegan like me.”PETA notes that more than 320 million hens are held on egg farms in the U.S., with an additional 20 million being held in Canada. This video footage was captured in April at Abbotsford facilities that on-site documents identified as Cloverhill Farms, Jaedel Enterprises, and Sonmark Enterprises.last_img read more

The Spot in MLB Lineups Where Managers Are Still Ignoring Sabermetrics

In the eternally running discussion thread “Hey Bill” at billjamesonline.com, the website of sabermetric legend Bill James, the question came up of measuring the growth of sabermetric knowledge. James’s idea? Measure the extent to which teams are taking park factors into account when judging their rosters. But Tom Tango, author of “The Book,” offered another gauge: look at which teams are using good hitters in the No. 2 lineup slot.Traditionally, the two-hole was the domain of contact hitters with good bat control, with premiums placed on the ability to hit behind the runner, to sacrifice bunt, and to generally move the leadoff man over (even if it meant making an out). You can see this statistically: During Major League Baseball’s expansion era (1961-present), the No. 2 slot has the highest aggregate contact rate of any batting order position.But research by Tango and his compatriots suggests teams have been doing it wrong. After examining how important each batting event (single, double, walk, etc.) is to each lineup slot — based on factors such as how many runners are likely to be on base and how many outs they’re likely to hit with — the data says a team ought to bat its three best hitters in the No. 1, No. 2 and No. 4 slots, with the most balanced hitter occupying the two-hole. That’s a far cry from the conventional wisdom of slotting the best hitter either third or fourth, and putting a weak contact specialist at No. 2.So, if there are more good hitters in the second position, it’s a possible sign sabermetrics has penetrated the managerial mindset. But if there’s a pattern toward a more enlightened lineup card, it’s not detectable by looking at the average quality of No. 2 hitters (according to weighted runs created, known as wRC+) since the introduction of the designated hitter in 1973:If we take a five-year moving average to smooth out year-to-year variance above, it’s even clearer that we’re not in the golden age of great hitters batting second:Historically, the quality levels of MLB leadoff and No. 2 hitters tend to track with each other — and contra the performances of third and fourth hitters. (Meanwhile, Nos. 5 and 6 have stayed fairly stable over the years, with the five slot outproducing six by a decent amount.) The good news is that it appears the two-hole has emerged from the dark ages of the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s, when slot Nos. 3 and 4 vastly outpaced Nos. 1 and 2.It may not be coincidental that the bleakest of times for the No. 2 spot came during MLB’s so-called steroid era. The stat we’re using, wRC+, compares a player’s per-plate appearance productivity against the average of all hitters, and the power hitters who frequently bat third and fourth may have received the benefits of performance-enhancing drugs at a greater rate than the overall population of MLB batters. (This would cause No. 2 hitters to move backward relative to the overall average, even if they themselves saw no change in talent.) With the specter of performance-enhancing drugs reduced in today’s game, the gap between hitter No. 2 and Nos. 3 and 4 has returned to its long-term norm.Still, today’s two-hole batters lag behind those of the halcyon late 1980s and early 1990s, when players such as Ryne Sandberg, Tony Gwynn, Wade Boggs, Roberto Alomar, Julio Franco and Lou Whitaker were doing a large share of their damage from the second spot in the lineup. It’s plausible that the conditions of the game back then simply favored the traditional archetype of the No. 2 hitter more (batting averages were higher, as was the ratio of on-base percentage to slugging), but today’s managers also don’t appear to be moving toward the sabermetric ideal of penciling the team’s best hitter into the No. 2 spot.Sabermetrics has come a long way since the first analysts began tinkering with mathematical models, and there are certainly places where statistical thinking has made its way onto the field (for example, the explosion of defensive shifts in today’s game is rooted in probability theory regarding where a batter is most likely to hit the ball). But when it comes to the two-hole, baseball’s decision-makers still have a bit of a climb ahead of them. read more

Why This NBA Rookie Class May Be The Best Of The Century

As we approach the end of the NBA’s regular season, awards conversations are all the rage. As usual, the two most talked-about races are for Most Valuable Player and Rookie of the Year. Whether it’s “Get Up” or The Jump, Sports Illustrated or CBS or NBA TV, or even NBA players themselves, everyone’s got an opinion on who should take home the hardware at the end of the season.The Rookie of the Year debate, at this point, pretty much boils down to the Mavericks’ Luka Doncic, who stormed out of the gate and grabbed onto front-runner status fairly quickly, and the Hawks’ Trae Young, who started off terribly but has been shining during the season’s second half.But lost among this debate is this: The entire 2018 NBA rookie class — or at least the top five picks — deserves an award. Collectively, they are having the best debut season of any group of top five picks in more than 25 years.Doncic (pick No. 3) is carrying averages of 21.2 points, 7.7 rebounds and 5.9 assists per game while acting as the primary facilitator and scoring option in Dallas. He is only the second rookie in NBA history to average at least 20, 7, and 5 in those categories, and the other is Oscar Robertson, who did so during the 1960-61 season.The man whom Doncic was traded for on draft night,1The Hawks drafted Doncic and traded him to the Mavericks in exchange for Young and Dallas’s top-five protected 2019 first-round pick. Young, has been nearly as productive, albeit less consistent, in his debut season for Atlanta. Young’s season-long numbers of 19.0 points, 3.7 rebounds and 8.1 assists per game are strong.2He’s one of only three rookies to have gone for 19, 3 and 8 per game. Those numbers, though, are dragged down by his poor start to the year. Since the All-Star break, he’s averaging 25.0 points, 4.6 rebounds and 9.2 assists a night, with shooting numbers that are far better than those he was posting earlier in the season as he struggled to adjust to the NBA game.Two of the first five picks in a given draft looking this good, this early, would be impressive on its own; but Doncic and Young are not alone in their shining debuts. The other three players selected in the top five — the Suns’ DeAndre Ayton (No. 1), the Kings’ Marvin Bagley III (No. 2) and the Grizzlies’ Jaren Jackson Jr. (No. 4) — have each been pretty damned good this year too.Ayton has been a monster offensive force for Phoenix from Day 1, and he is already one of the league’s best post scorers and offensive rebounders. Among rotation players averaging at least 2 post-ups per game, per NBA.com, Ayton’s 1.03 points per play on post-ups ranks third, behind only Joel Embiid and LaMarcus Aldridge. Ayton’s offensive rebound rate, meanwhile, ranks 22nd among the 263 players who have qualified for the minutes per game leaderboard. And he’s been improving on defense throughout the season.Bagley is averaging 14.8 points and 7.4 rebounds per game off the bench for the surprisingly frisky Kings. And he’s been even better since returning from a five-game, injury-related absence in early March, posting 18.5 points and 8.2 rebounds a night with an improved shooting line. He has a diverse, varied face-up game and is working to stretch his jumper, and given his athleticism and quick feet, his defense could eventually come around as well.Memphis shut down Jackson in late-February due to a quad injury, but before his season ended he averaged 13.8 points, 4.7 rebounds and 2.3 combined steals and blocks in just 26 minutes a night. He did all that despite being, at 19 years old, the second-youngest player in the league.3The Lakers’ Isaac Bonga is about a month younger than Jackson, and Bonga has played less than 100 minutes this season. Jackson also knocked down 35.9 percent of his threes and carried an above-average usage rate and true shooting percentage, which is wildly impressive for a player whose primary contributions were expected to come on the defensive end of the floor.So how does this season’s top five stack up against past classes? The chart below plots the collective win shares and win shares per 48 minutes for the top five picks in each draft class from 1979 through 2018 (otherwise known as the three-point era) during their respective debut seasons. Note that only players who played during the season immediately following that year’s draft are counted in this analysis; because we’re looking at the top five picks as a class, if a player did not debut with the rest of his class, it doesn’t make much sense to count him along with the others. For example, Ben Simmons was the No. 1 overall pick in 2016, but he did not play during the 2016-17 season, so he counts for 0 minutes and 0 win shares toward the total of that draft class. Simmons was excellent as a rookie once he did step on the floor, but it also would not make sense to group him with the 2017 draft class, because he was not drafted in 2017. Likewise, the same logic applies to Simmons’s Sixers teammate Joel Embiid, who was drafted in 2014 but did not debut until two years later.4It also applies to Jonas Valanciunas (stayed in Europe for a year before coming over and joining the Raptors); Blake Griffin (injured); Ricky Rubio (Europe); Greg Oden (injured); Danny Ferry (went to Italy for a year because he refused to play for the Clippers); David Robinson (naval service); and tragically, Len Bias (an overdose-caused death). 1982WorthyCummingsWilkinsGarnettThompson0.129 The top-five picks in the 2018 draft are in HOF companyThe five NBA draft classes with the highest win shares per 48 minutes Year1st2nd3rd4th5thWS per 48 min 1979JohnsonGreenwoodCartwrightKelserMoncrief0.137 1992O’NealMourningLaettnerJacksonEllis0.118 Hall of Fame inductees in boldSource: Basketball-Reference.com Draft pick 2018AytonBagley IIIDoncicJackson Jr.Young0.102 1984OlajuwonBowieJordanPerkinsBarkley0.174 As you can see, the 2018 class fares extremely well in both win shares — which represent Basketball-Reference.com’s attempt to divvy up credit for team wins to the individual players on the team — and win shares per 48 minutes. The 21.1 win shares collectively accumulated by Ayton, Bagley, Doncic, Jackson and Young ranks eighth among the last 40 draft classes during their respective debut seasons, while their win shares per 48 average of 0.102 makes this class one of just six to exceed 0.100 win shares per 48.One of those six classes (2009) saw only three players actually take the floor during their debut season, thanks to an injury that knocked Blake Griffin out for the year and Ricky Rubio’s contract with Barcelona that kept him in Spain for two years before he arrived stateside. Hasheem Thabeet, James Harden and Tyreke Evans saw varying degrees of success during their respective rookie years and ended up posting a collective average of 0.108 win shares per 48 minutes, but they also combined for only 11.9 total win shares, far fewer than the other five classes that stand out in this analysis, each of which exceeded 20 total win shares.It’s worth noting, then, who was actually taken in the top five in those five NBA drafts (1984, 1979, 1982 and 1992). It’s also worth noting that just a single class between 1992 and 2018 saw its top five post a win shares per 48 average better than 0.100, meaning it’s been nearly a generation since we saw an actual top five class debut with a performance as good as the one we’re seeing from the most recent draft class. Among the 20 players selected in the top five of those four drafts, eight are currently in the Basketball Hall of Fame. Another four — Bill Cartwright, Sidney Moncrief, Terry Cummings and Christian Laettner — made at least one All-Star team during their career. And six more became long-term rotation players. Only Greg Kelser and Bill Garnett failed to pan out at all, as they wound up out of the league entirely within a few seasons.That’s an incredible hit rate of solid NBA players, and bodes well for what we should expect from Ayton, Bagley, Doncic, Jackson and Young in the future. It’s obviously far too early to predict that any of these players will be enshrined in Springfield one day, but the future certainly appears bright, and it seems likely that the 2018 draft class will be remembered as one of the best in quite some time.Check out our latest NBA predictions. read more

EverBank Field Rating the sight of the Gator Bowl

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — It wasn’t the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., and it wasn’t the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, La., but the EverBank Field in Jacksonville, Fla., site of the 2012 Gator Bowl, was the best bowl game location Ohio State football could do this season. The stadium, home of the NFL’s Jacksonville Jaguars, holds more than 77,000 fans and was home of Super Bowl XXXIX between the New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles. The mostly-full stadium held 61,312 fans for Monday’s Gator Bowl, and The Lantern was there to cover the game, and rate the quality of the venue. Here is our rating of EverBank Field, should Buckeyes, Browns or Bengals fans find themselves there in the future. All categories were rated on a five-point scale, with a five being the highest. Sight lines/seating: One of the most important factors when shelling out big bucks for an NFL game or a college football bowl game is your proximity to the field and the sight lines. Luckily for those in attendance for Monday’s Gator Bowl, the Buckeyes’ and Gators’ sideline areas were narrow. The front row of seats was quite close to the playing surface. The stadium was not particularly tall, and the higher the row you sat in, the farther you were from the action, kind of like the Rose Bowl. Upper deck seats might not have been the best vantage point, but the expansive lower bowl would be well worth the price of admission. Lantern rating: 2 Access to stadium/location: Though the stadium wasn’t at full capacity, traffic to the game was manageable — a 15-minute cab ride from downtown Jacksonville. Public transit is an option, as is an elevated, light-rail train that runs right past the stadium. Very convenient. The stadium location is also quite nice. The Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville, home of the Double-A affiliate of Major League Baseball’s Miami Marlins, is a beautiful, red-brick ball field adjacent to EverBank Field. Lastly, and perhaps best of all, the stadium is located on the banks of the St. Johns River, which makes for a picturesque scene. Lantern rating: 4 Aesthetics of the stadium: EverBank Field is comprised mostly of large concrete ramps that run up to the upper levels of the stadium. It isn’t very colorful or particularly eye-grabbing. The open-air facility was very open indeed, and probably not conducive to allowing crowd noise to reverberate and bother the team you’re rooting against. Lantern rating: 1 Gameday atmosphere: There was a large tailgate party situated on a lawn outside of the stadium. Hundreds of fans attended, ate, drank and watched college football on a jumbo-sized television screen. The cost of admission to the tailgate was $10, but your “ticket” to enter was the official Gator Bowl patch — worn by both teams during the game — attached to a lanyard. The patch was a fine souvenir and the tailgate grounds gave fans the opportunity to meet and get pumped for the game. Lantern rating: 4.5 To visit or not to visit: All categories considered, EverBank Field garnered a 2.875. A trip to EverBank Field, which was built in 1995, could be justified for a college football bowl game. A trip to see the Jaguars, which finished the 2011 season with a 5-11 record, though? Probably not. read more

Football Ohio State tight ends embrace their role in the run game

Ohio State redshirt sophomore tight end Luke Farrell (89) carries the ball downfield in the first quarter of the game against Rutgers on Sept. 8. Ohio State won 52-3. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorOhio State has a tendency to recruit highly-touted tight ends. Of the four tight ends looking to make an impact for the Buckeyes this season, redshirt junior Rashod Berry, redshirt sophomore Luke Farrell, redshirt sophomore Jake Hausmann and freshman Jeremy Ruckert, three of them were rated in the top 10 of their position in their respective recruiting classes. With that, all four players came in with a similar mindset: to change the view of the role tight ends have in the Ohio State passing game. First comes an expectation for a part of the game that many tight ends were not familiar with coming into college: blocking. In high school, Berry said he never blocked as a tight end. However, when he entered the position room at Ohio State, the expectation remained. “As a tight end in high school, you don’t block,” Berry said. “It’s a natural thing. If you got it, you got it, if you don’t, you don’t, it’s going to take time. It took time for me, but once you get it, it’s muscle memory that you are not going to miss.” For Berry, he didn’t have it. The redshirt junior said he was not excited about that part of his position. However, knowing blocking was the only way he would see the field as a tight end, Berry began to work, repeating rep after rep, learning the basics. He created an attitude each block he made against a mat in practice. “You have to have the mindset, ‘I’m about to kill this dude,’” Berry said. “‘I’m about to hit this block.’” In the mind of offensive coordinator and tight ends coach Kevin Wilson, blocking is everything. With the running game stagnating with the rise of redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins and the passing game, Wilson has utilized two-tight end sets, using both Farrell and Berry, with one on the line of scrimmage, the primary position, and one as what many consider to be a fullback, blocking for the runner. This is the part of the tight end position that is crucial to the overall success of the Ohio State offense. “As coach Wilson likes to say, ‘You run into a lot of problems when you don’t have a tight end that can block well,’ whether it’s in protection or in perimeter running, running the quarterback too much and getting hits on him,” Farrell said. “He feels and we feel that it’s crucial for our offense for what we want to do.”  Berry has a different approach to his blocking skill. Recruited as a tight end out Lorain, Ohio, in the 2015 class, Berry moved to the defensive line for the 2016 season, playing 10 games at defensive end. He was moved back to the tight end position prior to the start of the 2017 season. With experience at both positions, Berry thinks he has a unique ability to pick up blocks other tight ends might not catch. “Just knowing what a D-lineman is going to do just because I did it,” Berry said. “It’s helping me on the blocking side, helping me where the linebackers are going to be at.”  The Ohio State tight ends, according to Farrell, are expecting to do everything evenly, excel in the blocking game and in the passing game. Berry said the passing game is going to come. However, the blocking aspect at tight end is a thankless job. But it’s one Berry has embraced, celebrating each time he makes a big block to secure a score for his teammate. “That’s my passion for the game,” Berry said. “When the game is on the line or even if it’s not on the line, just seeing my teammates score, it’s excitement for me, doing what I can for the team.” read more

FAA Renews Brunswick Executive Airports Participation in Military Airport Program

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The Federal Aviation Administration has selected Brunswick Executive Airport, Brunswick, Maine to participate in the fiscal 2016 Military Airport Program (MAP), allowing the business and general aviation airport at the former Brunswick Naval Air Station to remain in the program for five additional years.Brunswick was the only former military airport or joint use airport added to MAP this year, the third straight year FAA has picked only one participant. A total of 15 airports can participate in the program at one time.Brunswick’s selection will allow it to complete projects that started during the previous five years, according to an FAA fact sheet. Those projects include converting military hangars to civilian use, obstruction removal, drainage upgrades and installing wildlife fencing.MAP provides a critical source of federal funding for capital needs to support joint use airports and to convert former military airports to civilian use. MAP, a set-aside of the Airport Improvement Program (AIP), covers projects such as building or rehabilitating parking lots, fuel farms, hangars, utility systems, access roads, cargo buildings and other airfield projects. Many of these projects are not normally eligible for AIP funding, but projects for MAP-designated airports have unique eligibility rules to convert them to civilian or joint use.Airports already participating in MAP include:Kaleaeloa/John Rodgers Field, Kapolei, HawaiiCastle Airport, Atwater, Calif.Northwest Florida Regional Airport at Eglin AFB, Valparaiso, Fla.Griffiss International Airport, Rome, N.Y.Alexandria International Airport (former England AFB), Alexandria, La.José Aponte de la Torre Airport (former Naval Station Roosevelt Roads), Ceiba, Puerto Ricolast_img read more

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Clark Scurto Graduate From ColbySawyer College

first_imgNEW LONDON, NH — Colby-Sawyer College celebrated its 181st Commencement on Saturday, May 11,  2019, awarding approximately 185 undergraduate degrees and recognizing students and other individuals for academic excellence, outstanding contributions to society, and service to the college and community.Bridget Clark, of Wilmington, earned a B.S. in athletic training. Clark graduated magna cum laude as a member of Alpha Chi National College Honor Society, Iota Tau Alpha Honor Society in athletic training, the Athletic Training Club and president of the Exercise and Sport Sciences Club. She also earned the Exercise and Sport Sciences Baccalaureate and Capstone Awards.Joseph Scurto, of Wilmington, earned a B.S. in sport management. Scurto played for the baseball team.About Colby-Sawyer CollegeColby-Sawyer College is a comprehensive college that integrates the liberal arts and sciences with professional preparation. The college’s faculty, staff and students strive for excellence in an engaged teaching and learning community that fosters students’ academic, intellectual, and personal growth. With a strong emphasis on learning outcomes, including breadth and depth of knowledge, self-growth, creative and critical thinking, and effective communication, Colby-Sawyer prepares students to thrive post-graduation and make a positive impact upon a dynamic, diverse and interdependent world.Founded in 1837, Colby-Sawyer is located in the scenic Lake Sunapee Region of central New Hampshire. Learn more about the college’s vibrant teaching and learning community at http://www.colby-sawyer.edu.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Colby-Sawyer College via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Bischoff & Clark Named To Dean’s List At Colby-Sawyer CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 3 Wilmington Students Perform Internships Through Colby-Sawyer CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joseph Scurto Completes Internship At Colby-Sawyer CollegeIn “Education”last_img read more

Microsoft Kano are releasing a PC kids can build with a storybook

first_img Abt Electronics 0 Now playing: Watch this: See it Review • Windows 10 review: Microsoft gets it right $179 $143 Mentioned Above Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (OEM) Share your voice Amazon $145 $169 Best Buy See Itcenter_img null CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Microsoft 4:33 Laptops Toys and Tabletop Games See It The Kano PC is a buildable two-in-one computer that kids can assemble using a storybook’s instructions. Kano Your kid’s next buildable project might very well be a full-blown two-in-one laptop that’s running Windows. Kano and Microsoft are unveiling the Kano PC Wednesday, which is an 11.6-inch touch-enabled tablet that is designed for kids to assemble with the help of a storybook.The Atom-powered computer appears to have a keyboard cover similar to those in the Microsoft Surface series, and is preloaded with Windows 10 in S mode as well as programs such as an app called How Computers Work that should also give kids a primer in the makings of the machine. Minecraft: Education Edition will be preloaded onto the machine, but unfortunately will require an activation purchase in order to play. Microsoft tech teaches children who are blind how to… Microsoft Windows 10 Tags Other specs for the kid-friendly PC include 4GB of RAM, 64GB of eMMC storage that can be upgraded with a microSD card, two USB ports, an HDMI port and a headphone jack.The Kano PC is available for preorder at $300 and £300 on Kano’s website and the Microsoft Store. It’s set to go on sale in the US and UK on Oct. 21.Kano has a number of kid-friendly computer and coding kits already, which have previously included a Harry Potter-themed coding kit with wand and a computer running a Kano OS operating system.Update, June 24, 2019 at 1:07 p.m. PT: Clarifies that Minecraft: Education Edition is not playable on the Kano PC with purchase of the computer. See Itlast_img read more

College teacher killed in road crash

first_imgA college teacher was killed after being run over by a truck in Patkelghata on Satkhira-Khulna highway in Satkhira on Saturday morning, reports UNB.The deceased is Jahanara Khatun, 38, wife of Shahadat Hossain of Tala’s Nawapara area. She was a lecturer of biology at Patkelghata Harun-Ur-Rashid College.Patkelghata police station’s officer-in-charge Rezaul Islam said an oil-laden truck hit Jahanara near the Pallibidyut office, killing her on the spot.The body was sent to sadar hospital for an autopsy, the OC added.The truck driver has been arrested.last_img read more

New 3DS XL has a superior IPS display the New 3DS does

first_imgWhen Sony started introducing the PS Vita Slim as a replacement for the 1st-gen PS, Vita do you remember what the main talking point was? The display. Sony shifted from OLED to LCD for the new model, and a lot of gamers were not very happy about it. In the end the compromise wasn’t too bad, and the other benefits of the Slim model made it a good enough replacement handheld.With the launch of the New 3DS and New 3DS XL, it seems Nintendo has introduced a similar, albeit much more noticeable display change. However, they’ve kept very quiet on the fact this has happened beyond a listing on a Japanese Wikipedia spec sheet.The older model 3DS and 3DS XL used TN panels for both the upper and lower displays. With the new models, the New 3DS retains the TN panels for both screen, but the New 3DS XL uses an IPS panel for its upper non-touch display. The benefits of doing this are clear to see.Both TN and IPS panels have their advantages and disadvantages, but IPS is the superior of the two in this situation. IPS has much better color accuracy from all viewing angles, as well as displaying much clearer images and having a more stable response time. They do use roughly 15 percent more power than TN panels, though. This may explain why Nintendo only included one in the larger 3DS as it has the battery to cope.I’ve included some comparison shots in this post that compare the old 3DS XL TN panel with the New 3DS XL IPS panel. You can clearly see how much crisper and vibrant the image is, and it makes the new XL the better choice, not only over the older hardware, but also over the smaller New 3DS.So if you are undecided on which model to get, I think this screen difference will push a lot of people to the XL model because of the better colors and viewing angle benefits. However, if the larger model doesn’t fit your needs, the New 3DS display is still of a higher quality than the older models, and you still get the other benefits (faster processor/wireless, better 3D, C-stick, ability to play some newer games including Xenoblade Chronicles).Of course, if you’re reading this in North America then Nintendo has already made the choice for you as you can only buy the New 3DS XL![Images courtesy of wellthedudeabides on Imgur]last_img read more

Biggest map of dinosaur tree yet suggests they emerged 20 million years

first_img Journal information: Biology Letters More information: G. T. Lloyd et al. Probabilistic divergence time estimation without branch lengths: dating the origins of dinosaurs, avian flight and crown birds, Biology Letters (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0609AbstractBranch lengths—measured in character changes—are an essential requirement of clock-based divergence estimation, regardless of whether the fossil calibrations used represent nodes or tips. However, a separate set of divergence time approaches are typically used to date palaeontological trees, which may lack such branch lengths. Among these methods, sophisticated probabilistic approaches have recently emerged, in contrast with simpler algorithms relying on minimum node ages. Here, using a novel phylogenetic hypothesis for Mesozoic dinosaurs, we apply two such approaches to estimate divergence times for: (i) Dinosauria, (ii) Avialae (the earliest birds) and (iii) Neornithes (crown birds). We find: (i) the plausibility of a Permian origin for dinosaurs to be dependent on whether Nyasasaurus is the oldest dinosaur, (ii) a Middle to Late Jurassic origin of avian flight regardless of whether Archaeopteryx or Aurornis is considered the first bird and (iii) a Late Cretaceous origin for Neornithes that is broadly congruent with other node- and tip-dating estimates. Demonstrating the feasibility of probabilistic time-scaling further opens up divergence estimation to the rich histories of extinct biodiversity in the fossil record, even in the absence of detailed character data. © 2016 Phys.org (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the U.K. and the U.S. has mapped the biggest dinosaur tree yet, and in so doing, has found that the creatures may have evolved 20 million years earlier than most in the field have thought. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the team describes how they created the new tree using probabilistic methods and why the new findings suggest that the dinosaurs might have survived a prior mass extinction. Group builds most comprehensive family tree of birds to date This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Comparison of probabilistic APT dates (red bars, cal3; blue bars, Hedman; see the text) for key nodes in dinosaur phylogeny: Dinosauria I (Nyasasaurus as sister to Dinosauria), Dinosauria II (Nyasasaurus nested within Dinosauria), Avialae I (Archaeopteryx as first bird), Avialae II (Aurornis as first bird) and Neornithes (crown birds). Asterisks mark minimum bound or ‘traditional’ palaeontological estimate. Molecular and morphological clock dates for Neornithes are shown in the lower right corner (A–J; electronic supplementary material, table S3): circles indicate mean and horizontal bars the 95% HPD. Silhouettes were taken from public domain images on phylopic.org (Aurornis, Gareth Monger; Eoraptor, Scott Hartman; Vegavis, Matt Martyniuk), or modified with kind permission from works by Sergio Pérez (Archaeopteryx) and Nobu Tamura (Nyasasaurus). Credit: Biology Letters (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0609 Citation: Biggest map of dinosaur tree yet suggests they emerged 20 million years earlier than thought (2016, November 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-11-biggest-dinosaur-tree-emerged-million.html Explore further By examining dinosaur bones, scientists have been able to establish what they believe are reasonable estimates for the time period that dinosaurs existed. But such estimates have always left some room for error. In this latest effort, the researchers used two probabilistic methods to create a massive tree representing almost 1,000 species and calculated the date of first emergence of what we now call dinosaurs. The results from the studies matched, giving credence to the results. Their tree shows dinosaurs first appearing approximately 250 million years ago. Furthermore, the tree shows what are believed to have been the first birds branching off the tree approximately 165 to 172 million years ago. It also shows that the group that includes all known birds came to exist approximately 69 to 108 million years ago—during the Late Cretaceous, which, interestingly, was before the mass extinction that wiped out all the other dinosaurs.Notably, the tree shows dinosaurs coming into existence during a time prior to the oldest known dinosaur fossil, a Nyasasaurus, which has been dated to just 240 million years ago. This means researchers will have to rely on math and faith if they are to accept the new tree—at least until an older fossil is found. The team also believes that there is some evidence that indicates the timeline could be pushed back another 10 million years.The new timeline, if correct, would mean that the creatures that evolved into dinosaurs somehow managed to survive the Permo-Triassic extinction—believed to be the largest mass extinction that ever occurred.last_img read more

The Entrepreneurs Behind This Multibillion Dollar Company Share Why Success Is Nothing

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. June 14, 2018 Editor’s Note: Entrepreneur’s “20 Questions” series features both established and up-and-coming entrepreneurs and asks them a number of questions about what makes them tick, their everyday success strategies and advice for aspiring founders.Managing money and making it grow can be a confusing and expensive proposition.Baiju Bhatt and Vlad Tenev started their investing platform Robinhood to try and make even the most novice investor feel comfortable and figure out a system that works for them — whether they are going for more traditional stocks or working in the world of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Etherium.Rather than make a commission on those investments, Robinhood’s business model is based around a monthly premium service Robinhood Gold, which allows users to increase their buying power and gain access to after-hours trading. It also brings in revenue by collecting interest on the cash and securities in user accounts, similar to how banks treat cash deposits.Since launching the platform in in 2013, the company has grown to a user base of more than than 4 million users and over $100 billion in transaction volume. To date, they have also raised $539 million in funding, valuing the business at $5.6 billion.We caught up with Bhatt and Tenev to ask them 20 Questions and find out what makes them tick.Related: This Successful Entrepreneur Shares the Simple Mantra That Helps Her Take Big Risks1. How do you start your day?Baiju Bhatt: I’m usually out of bed by 7am and try to get to the office early, which gives me a couple of uninterrupted hours to work on my individual projects. Tinkering with, and building the products Robinhood ships brings me joy.Vlad Tenev: I wake up at around 6:30 am and spend some time with my wife, Celina, and our 1-year-old daughter, Nora, who enjoys crawling around the house as I get dressed and ready for work. Spending time with my family before I get to work is an essential part of my morning routine, and gets me motivated and ready to tackle the work day.2. How do you end your day?Bhatt: Most nights of the week I make it a point to get home in time to have dinner with my wife. It’s a simple routine to maintain my work-life balance.Tenev: I try to come home around 7:30 pm, in time for Nora’s nightly bath. Sometimes, I come back to the office around 9 pm, or work a bit more from home until I go to bed, usually around 11:00 pm.3. What’s a book that changed your mind and why?Bhatt: Brighter Than a Thousand Suns by Robert Jungk and Surely You’re Joking, Mr Feynman! by Richard Feynman were both books my father purchased for me when I was in high school. Both left a lasting impression on me, because they chronicle the lives of some of the most creative scientists of the 21st century.Tenev: I recently read Antifragile by Nassim Nicholas Taleb, who is probably better known for writing The Black Swan. This book discusses systems that actually improve as a result of volatility and external stressors. The general concept is applicable to many fields beyond biology, for instance finance, economics and monetary policy.4. What’s a book you always recommend and why?Bhatt: The Case for Mars by Robert Zubrin. I’m fascinated by the privatization of the space industry, and Zubrin’s literature provides an inspiring perspective on what the colonization of Mars could look like.  Tenev: I like the classics such as The Republic by Plato and The Art of War by Sun Tzu. I think there is something special about books that have stood the test of time and been read by millions of people over millennia.5. What’s a strategy to keep focused?Bhatt: I limit how often I let technology interrupt my day, which given my line of work, isn’t always easy. So, for example, I turned off all notifications on my phone a few years ago. I also prefer taking notes with a notebook and pen rather than in an app.Tenev: Over the past few years I’ve become much more deliberate about how I spend my time. At work, this involves scheduling time in advance to prepare for important meetings and also just to think. Outside of the office, I rarely stay up late or go out at night. I make sure I am well-rested and at the top of my game, even on weekends.6. When you were a kid what did you want to be when you grew up?Bhatt: I wanted to be a physicist. When I was growing up, my father worked at NASA and he would buy me science books for my birthdays.Tenev: My childhood dream was to be a writer. When I was in sixth grade I remember being very upset by the ending of Animal Farm by George Orwell. I wrote a full-length sequel [to the book]l in which a group of kind and just animals take back control of the farm.7. What did you learn from the worst boss you ever had?Bhatt: I’ve only had one real job in my life before I started my first company with Vlad, so I haven’t had a bad boss experience. Hopefully, it stays that way.Tenev: I never had an actual boss because I mostly did research prior to starting my first finance company. I wish I had a lot more hands-on mentorship from the research supervisors that I worked with.8. Who has influenced you most when it comes to how you approach your work?Bhatt: Vlad. He’s persistent, creative and cool-as-a-cucumber in the most stressful of situations.Tenev: Baiju is probably the person I’ve spent the largest amount of time working with, and I try to emulate whenever possible. I admire Baiju’s strong product intuition and ability to drive us to build products that customers really love.9. What’s a trip that changed you?Bhatt: I’ve taken quite a few road trips across the country as an adult, and each time I’m reminded of the diverse backgrounds and experiences of Americans, and the abundance of our natural resources.Tenev: When I was in high school I went on a school trip to the Galapagos Islands. I learned that there are places in the world that are basically untouched by humans, and I yearn to return.10. What inspires you and why?Bhatt: I’m inspired by those whose creativity has changed the world —  from Alexander Hamilton, to Richard Feynman and Steve Jobs. Tenev: I’m inspired by great entrepreneurs, scientists and creative builders who have changed the world they inhabit through grit and determination.Related: Health and Beauty Mogul Bobbi Brown Shares The Biggest Time Sucker — and What You Can Do About It11. What was your first business idea and what did you do with it?Bhatt: Before we launched Robinhood, our first joint startup business was offering tools for hedge funds and banks to build automated trading strategies. This was the precursor to Robinhood, and inspired us to bring existing technology to the retail brokerage market.12. What was an early job that taught you something important or useful?Bhatt: The summer after my senior year of high school I worked on a particle accelerator at Jefferson Lab. I learned the importance of being able to figure out how to get stuff done even though I had jumped into the deep end.  Tenev: When I was in elementary school my friend and I set up a stand in the neighborhood to sell household tools. Selling is a basic skill that unfortunately isn’t taught in schools.13. What’s the best advice you ever took?Bhatt: Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford commencement speech. “Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.”Tenev: Choose a great life partner! True for both my co-founder and my wife; they make me better with each passing day.14. What’s the worst piece of advice you ever got?Bhatt: In the context of Robinhood, we’ve gotten advice on the rate at which we should grow our team. Robinhood has been able to scale by hiring the right people, not the most people.Tenev: When we first started the company, we got turned down by about 75 investors. If we had listened to most of the advice we were given then, Robinhood wouldn’t be what it is today.15. What’s a productivity tip you swear by?Bhatt: Take lots of notes. Details matter.Tenev: Write everything down.16. Is there an app or tool you use in a surprising way to get things done or stay on track?Bhatt: Maybe it’s not that surprising, but having a notebook and a pencil handy is all I need.Tenev: I’m not really answering the question here, but for the past several months I have been keeping my phone in a different room when I sleep. Also, when I have my phone with me I keep it on Do Not Disturb mode. There’s nothing worse for my productivity than constantly being interrupted.17. What does work-life balance mean to you?Bhatt: Having the mental space to focus just on work at the office, and just on family and relaxing at home.Tenev: I try to optimize my life around working and spending time with my wife and daughter, which is what I enjoy the most. Everything else I put on the backburner.18. How do you prevent burnout?Bhatt: Daily exercise and spending time in nature.Tenev: Try a scene change — go to the gym, on a hike, or take a vacation.19. When you’re faced with a creativity block, what’s your strategy to get innovating?Bhatt: I like debating and challenging my assumptions, especially on tough problems. I like working with people who come to different conclusions, and seek to understand their thinking.Tenev: Ignore the problem for a few days, get the subconscious mind working on it. When you’re doing something totally unrelated, the solution might just pop into your head.20. What are you learning now?Bhatt: I’m learning to be a better public speaker and leader of people. As the organization and headcount at Robinhood has grown to over 150 employees, it’s a fascinating new challenge.Tenev: I have been learning the Irish Whistle and trying to teach my daughter how to play it. It’s a small, recorder-type instrument, and it should be easy to play. I’m excited about teaching my daughter the joy of music. Register Now »center_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 10 min readlast_img read more

Happy 170th birthday to Staffordshires ticket to ride

first_imgDave Barrett and Robin Mathams In 2017 the busy services take 56 minutes to travel from Stafford to Rugby – travelling at up to 125mph. But back in 1847 the stopping passenger service would have taken two and a quarter hours – longer than most journeys between Stafford and London nowadays. At first the line was used for through goods traffic and local stopping passenger services only, but Victoria, husband Prince Albert and their-then five children were aboard the first through train of passenger coaches to use the line, on their way from Fleetwood to London, on an unscheduled passage of the Royal Train. Robin and Dave said: “The train had hastily been laid on because the Royal Family had experienced a severe delay due to a storm on their sea voyage from Scotland. “The line was due to be opened on June 26 1847, for which a sumptuous luncheon for around 600 guests was held at Tamworth, but because of the recent disastrous collapse of Robert Stephenson’s bridge over the River Dee at Chester, the opening was delayed whilst six bridges of a similar, but upgraded design, were subjected to additional tests and found to be fit for purpose – they lasted some 50 years. An engraving of Rugeley Station published in the London Gazette “Sir Robert Peel was the principal speaker at the luncheon and Sir Robert’s brother, Edmund, was Chairman of the Trent Valley Railway Company.” The Trent Valley Railway Company had been formed in April 1844 by a group of mainly Manchester businessmen, to build a line to bypass Birmingham giving a more direct line to the north, Robin and Dave explained. This timber trestle bridge at Baswich spanned the River Penk and Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal before it was destroyed by fire in 1858. “Theirs wasn’t the first proposal for such a line, but they succeeded. They later sold their company and the line – still under construction – to the London and Birmingham Railway Company in April 1846, it becoming part of the mighty London and North Western Railway which was established three months later on July 16. “The railway was initially surveyed by Robert Stephenson. It was constructed by Thomas Brassey and partners with construction starting in November 1845, the same month Sir Robert Peel ceremonially cut the first sod of earth at Tamworth. It took 18 months to build and cost £1.177m (around £160m today). Volunteers give Longton railway station ‘a spring clean’ “Of the 11 original stations – Milford and Brocton being opened 30 years later – Nuneaton, Atherstone, Tamworth, Lichfield Trent Valley and Rugeley Trent Valley remain open today. At Polesworth only the northbound platform remains open, with one train per day calling at 7.23am. Villagers call on HS2 plan for Whitmore and Madeley to be revised – with residents told to have their say “Atherstone Station retains its original, magnificent Trent Valley Railway building designed by John Livock, but rest of the buildings have long since been demolished, apart from Station House at Colwich and the level crossing keeper’s lodge at Mancetter, Atherstone.” Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA RAILWAY line that provides a vital link to London for Staffordshire passengers celebrates its 170 anniversary today. The Trent Valley Railway, a 50 mile section of the West Coast Main Line between Stafford and Rugby, was opened on September 15 1847 – 10 years into the reign of Queen Victoria. Little Haywood residents Robin Mathams and Dave Barrett have spent the past eight years researching the detailed history of the line, which passes through Rugeley, Lichfield, Tamworth, Atherstone and Nuneaton and is currently served by London Midland trains. A photograph of the approach side, courtesy of Mrs Margaret Neal, showing the half-timbered Rugeley station building designed by John Livock and built by Thomas Brassey.last_img read more

Cable industry body Cable Europe has welcomed an a

first_imgCable industry body Cable Europe has welcomed an agreement reached this week between the European Parliament and Council on the draft Electronic Communications Code, with executive chairman Matthias Kurth highlighting the absence of sector-specific rules and any new definition of market power.Telecom industry organisation the European Telecommunications Network Operators (ETNO) on the other hand has slammed the agreement as a “missed opportunity”.The two European bodies – the Parliament and Council – reached agreement late yesterday on the planned update to the EU’s telecom rules.According to the European Commission, the deal between the pair means that rules have been agreed to help Europe achieve its broadband connectivity targets, ensuring the availability of 5G spectrum by the end of 2020 and facilitating the rollout of high-capacity fixed networks by making rules for co-investment more predictable and promoting risk sharing in the deployment of very high capacity networks, as well as promoting sustainable competition.The EC said that the the new rules will also ensure closer cooperation between the Commission and the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) in supervising measures related to the new key access provisions of co-investment and symmetric regulation.The Parliament, in its statement, said that the agreement encourages existing civil engineering infrastructure to be used, wherever possible, as well as agreements between operators, where these have a positive effect on competition.Matthias KurthFor Cable Europe, Kurth said welcomed the fact that the agreement avoids “any suggestion of creating sector-specific rules or redefining the market power concept – which would have come at enormous risk”.The cable body had been concerned about debate around tighter ‘symmetric access rules’ that would have forced cable operators to open up their networks to rival providers.“It now appears that this provision will only be applied under strict conditions and in exceptional circumstances. That is essential, because a consistent and harmonised application of the law is key to the creation of the Digital Single Market,” said Kurth.“Access to networks should not be granted lightly and incentives to invest should remain front and centre of the policy framework. We’re pleased to see that implementation of the Code will come with strong supervision from the European Commission and BEREC.”He added the caveat that the extent to which the code will bring benefits will depend on implementation by national states and regulators.Phillip MallochFor telecom operators on the other hand, ETNO said that “the code will not ignite the much needed rush to invest in 5G and fibre networks and it will add complexity to an already burdensome system.”It said that the agreed law foresees only limited progress on spectrum and “a complex and watered down compromise on incentivising fibre investment, uncertain triggers for imposing regulatory remedies and no fair playing field for digital services users and providers”.In sharp contrast to the tone set by Cable Europe, ETNO said that the code was “an unfortunate example of Europe lacking a strong and coherent industrial policy” and that it would now be up to national authorities “to try to match this need”.Phillip Malloch, ETNO executive board chair, said: “The new Code was a once in a decade opportunity to take the policy decisions required for Europe to become a catalyst to investment. This is fundamental to keep pace in the shifting global economy. It was an opportunity that has been missed. It’s a huge shame that the major investors in infrastructure will face additional and unnecessary headwind in building a true gigabit society.”last_img read more