Connectingto Better Educational Opportunities

first_imgA lot of the educational development in Liberian schools have one way or another been facilitated by the use of technology. Whether it is from downloading files from online for future references, searching for useful classroom material, nursery rhymes or searching for just the weather, mobile phones/tablets have become the educational tool.A handful of schools, including the More Than Me (MTM) Academy, are excited about using information and communication technology (ICT) devices such as tablets for use in teaching and learning.Such technology in the Liberian educational system gives pupils access to learning material, workbooks, and other subject matter from the Liberian Curriculum.The Liberian government has an open-source version of the Liberian Curriculum that can be placed on tablets, providing a “learning pace” for students who can’t afford to go to school.MTM has used the Skype Class before, using teachers in America to teach girls in their classrooms in Liberia. There were of course some challenges, including the language barrier and the quality of Internet connection both of which hindered a smooth learning process. “Both countries speak English. The children over here can understand the teachers, but when it comes to our English, the people there can’t understand it,” Sam Herring shared.The Academy intends to use the technology once more this school year and they’re in search of great educators abroad that want to teach their students through Skype.Herring, who is MTM’s Special Projects Manager, says having technology such as tablets can cater to the learning environment for each specific child in the classrooms.“Imagine having a classroom of students where only one or two are picking up. Instead of dividing them, the tablets will allow the teacher to focus on that child directly instead of pointing him/her out to their classmates as being behind. The child can learn at his/her own pace with a tablet,” he explained.Considering the fact that having such technology devices can be very expensive, More Than Me believe when it comes to education and empowering people, there should not be a price. “Without education, Liberia will never change. If you can give a child a basic and primary k-12 grade education, you can make them productive and a functional part of society,” he stated.Meanwhile, MTM says the purpose of using technology in Liberia is to customize the learning system rather then change the Liberian curriculum.‘With the tablets its more then just Internet service, we are looking to get them into every school we might partner with. We’re not looking to put together a different curriculum from what the government already has. Rather, we’re finding ways to supplement it and add things to it that will enhance the learning environment,” he added.Technology in the Liberian schools will connect students to what every student around the world has and that’s information.“It will happen with every government school that we will work with in the future,” he says.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

New monitors introduced for GWI sewage workers

first_imgSewage workers employed by the Guyana Water Incorporated (GWI) will now have a few implemented mechanisms at their disposal to protect them from hazardous gases and other materials that can affect their health.GWI Managing Director, Dr Richard Van West-CharlesThis is according to Managing Director of GWI, Dr Richard Van West-Charles, who told media operatives that monitors have being installed to detect gases that are present in these sewers, indicating if it’s safe or not to operate.“We introduced new monitors for the workers going into the sewers, so as to be able to detect the type and concentration of gases that are present before workers are being sent into the sewers. This is a significant advance, but it’s important in terms of where we place workers’ health in the scheme of things within the company,” he said.Van West-Charles indicated that the workers were engaged, and the decision was finalised after discussions were conducted to address a number of pertinent issues. Now they are able to monitor all combustive gases which may pose a threat.“It’s (from) the dialogue that we have with the workers who have got to go into the sewers that we’re able to raise these issues; and resulting from meeting with the workers, we’re able to work very quickly to put in place the monitors,” Dr Van West Charles indicated.Additionally, facilities will soon be constructed which would allow for them to take a shower and wash their clothes after finishing the job.“I’m a bit disappointed that we haven’t been able to complete the baths as yet for the sewage workers. We’re hoping to complete it within the next quarter. It’s very critical for their own health, the health of the public, and the health of the families,” he said.As it relates to the pump stations, a few departments of the utility company will be collaborating to create new equipment which can trap materials which obstruct the impellers.“The Sanitation Department, they have been doing a lot of work in the systems as a whole at pump stations to ensure that the challenges which we have with respect to meeting all types of material are now ongoing with the Design Infrastructural Department, a new design to be able to trap all of the pieces of cloth and fibres and so forth, which tie up the impellers of the pumps,” GWI’s Managing Director said.It was related that attention is also being placed on the treatment of sewage water. The replacement of the sewer network along the trench crossing at Lamaha is also on the company’s agenda.last_img read more