WBJ Honors Minority Business Leaders at the MGM

first_imgBy Micha Green, AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor, mgreen@afro.comAs part of their annual celebration to recognize businessmen of color, on March 28 the Washington Business Journal gathered distinguished guests at the MGM National Harbor for an evening of merriment celebrating the 12th Annual Minority Business Leader Awards.The evening began with a networking reception, leading to an MGM ballroom for dinner and the reason why the hundreds of guests came out, to honor business leaders of colors.  While most people in the room were heavy hitters in business, banking and more, notable guests included Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks and District of Columbia Council member Brandon Todd (D- Ward 4).Angel Rich, founder and CEO of The Wealth Factory accepts her Rising Star Award at the 12th Annual Washington Business Leader Awards held at the MGM National Harbor. (Photo by Micha Green)“Tonight we’re here to acknowledge the accomplishments of a dynamic group of our business leaders, who have blazed the trail in business and left an indelible mark on the community.  Our region is better as a result of the 25 possessing that formidable combination,” Thomas Penny II, president of Donahoe Hospitality Services and 2010 Minority Business Leader awardee told the crowd.As Women’s History Month wound down, Penny also noted the many women who were being honored. “When I shared the list of honorees with my wife and my 23-year-old daughter, they were especially pleased to see so many women represented in tonight’s class of honorees.”Some of the standup women included Tashni-Ann Dubroy form Howard University, Leslie Hale from RLJ Lodging Trust, Viola Llewellyn of Oyamaba Solutions and Letiti Procter from Donohoe Hospitality Services.In addition to the 25 honorees, three rising starts were also highlighted, including, Clear Cloud’s Dr. Charles Thomas Jr., Brllnt’s Julie Weber and Angel Rich, founder and CEO of The Wealth Factory.“All the men in my family served in the military and for the most part a lot of the women in my family have been entrepreneurs. Specifically, my mother was an entrepreneur and it provided a lot of influence for me- traveling around the country with her as an entrepreneur.   So it was always expected of me to become an entrepreneur,” Rich said in a video, which played as she accepted her award.“One of the greatest days in my family is when I actually quit my job.  My mother was actually more proud of me when I quit my job, than when I got my job.  So entrepreneurship is definitely in my blood,” Rich added.The title sponsor of the Minority Business Leader Awards was Holland & Knight, with gold sponsors including, Bank of America, Pepco and Howard University and gold non-profit sponsors Goodwill of Greater Washington, all of whom had representatives from organizations speak on behalf of the business and give awards to the special honorees. Further, each sponsor emphasized the importance of continuing uplifting diversity in business.last_img read more

App Developer to Facebook We Had Paper First

first_img 2 min read Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalscenter_img February 4, 2014 If a competitor has its way, Facebook may have some serious rewrites to do on Paper, its much-ballyhooed new reader app.Georg Petschnigg, co-founder and CEO of FiftyThree — a mobile design firm that brought to market its own app entitled Paper in 2012 — says he wants Facebook to stop using his brand name.But the legal lines are blurry. While FiftyThree’s original trademark claim was filed for “Paper by FiftyThree,” reports TechCrunch, it applied for a “Paper” trademark on Jan. 30 — the very day that Facebook announced its own venture.Related: Facebook Impresses With Reader App ‘Paper’This is most likely because “Paper by FiftyThree” would have been far easier to claim than a term as generic as “Paper,” trademark lawyer Victor Cardona explained.“An app about stories shouldn’t start with someone else’s story,” Petschnigg wrote on FiftyThree’s blog. “What will Facebook’s story be? Will they be the corporate giant who bullies their developers? Or be agile, recognize a mistake, and fix it?”FiftyThree’s Paper — which can be used on iPads to draw and write with a variety of brushes, pencils and mixable color palettes — was named Apple’s App of the Year in 2012 and is currently utilized by 100 million people, it says.Related: On Facebook’s 10th Birthday, Mark Zuckerberg Reflects on the Long Journey of Creating a Social Media PowerhouseComplicating matters is FiftyThree’s numerous ties to Facebook, writes Petschnigg: “One of Facebook’s board members is an investor in FiftyThree. We’re a Facebook developer, and Paper supports sharing to Facebook where close to 500,000 original pages have been shared. Connections run deep.”While Facebook offered an apology for not having contacted FiftyThree sooner, Petschnigg says an apology is not enough. He told TechCrunch that the company is keeping its legal options open. But even with a reported $15 million in funding, it remains to be seen whether FiftyThree would have the resources and weight to take on an opponent as massive as Facebook.Related: Facebook Is More Addictive and Widely Used Than Everlast_img read more

Microsoft Opens Door to Android Apple Phone Apps

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Microsoft Corp is making it easier for apps written for rival Google Inc’s Android and Apple Inc’s iOS systems to work on Windows phones, in a bid to attract users to its unpopular mobile devices, the company’s operating systems chief said on Wednesday.The move marks a radical shift in strategy for the world’s biggest software company, which still dominates the personal computer market but has failed to get any real traction on tablets and phones, partly because of a lack of apps.Microsoft has found itself in a circular trap, as many developers will not build apps for Windows phones which have few users, and few people want the phones which have fewer apps than Android or Apple phones.Getting apps built for Android and iOS onto its phones and tablets could be a shortcut to breaking out of that trap.”Microsoft is making a major play to win back developers,” said Forrester analyst Michael Facemire. “They’ve opened up the once-impenetrable castle walls.”Speaking at Microsoft’s developer conference in San Francisco on Wednesday, Executive Vice President Terry Myerson said developers will be able to use the vast majority of their Android code to turn their apps into Windows-compatible versions, which will work on Windows phones running a special subsystem.The apps will technically be Windows apps and available only through Microsoft’s online app store. The apps would automatically use Microsoft’s services such as Bing maps, rather than Google’s services, as an app would on an Android phone. That is a crucial distinction because Google gets revenue from ads on services rather than from the Android system itself.Myerson also announced a surprise move to make it easier for iOS developers to make Windows apps, saying that Microsoft’s developer software will be compatible with Objective C, the main programming language used by Apple.Google declined to comment. Apple did not immediately respond to requests for comment.Microsoft, which bought Nokia’s handset business last year, has only 3 percent of the global smartphone market. By contrast, Android phones, led by Samsung, control 81 percent of the market and Apple 15 percent, according to Strategy Analytics.Microsoft is scheduled to release its new Windows 10 operating system this summer, which for the first time will run across PCs, tablets and phones. It said on Wednesday it is aiming for one billion devices running Windows 10 in two to three years time.Its new browser will arrive as Microsoft Edge, replacing the waning Internet Explorer, when Windows 10 is released, the company said.(Reporting by Bill Rigby; Editing by Marguerita Choy and Richard Chang) This story originally appeared on Reuters Register Now » April 30, 2015 3 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more