Microsoft Kano are releasing a PC kids can build with a storybook

first_img Abt Electronics 0 Now playing: Watch this: See it Review • Windows 10 review: Microsoft gets it right $179 $143 Mentioned Above Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (OEM) Share your voice Amazon $145 $169 Best Buy See Itcenter_img null CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Microsoft 4:33 Laptops Toys and Tabletop Games See It The Kano PC is a buildable two-in-one computer that kids can assemble using a storybook’s instructions. Kano Your kid’s next buildable project might very well be a full-blown two-in-one laptop that’s running Windows. Kano and Microsoft are unveiling the Kano PC Wednesday, which is an 11.6-inch touch-enabled tablet that is designed for kids to assemble with the help of a storybook.The Atom-powered computer appears to have a keyboard cover similar to those in the Microsoft Surface series, and is preloaded with Windows 10 in S mode as well as programs such as an app called How Computers Work that should also give kids a primer in the makings of the machine. Minecraft: Education Edition will be preloaded onto the machine, but unfortunately will require an activation purchase in order to play. Microsoft tech teaches children who are blind how to… Microsoft Windows 10 Tags Other specs for the kid-friendly PC include 4GB of RAM, 64GB of eMMC storage that can be upgraded with a microSD card, two USB ports, an HDMI port and a headphone jack.The Kano PC is available for preorder at $300 and £300 on Kano’s website and the Microsoft Store. It’s set to go on sale in the US and UK on Oct. 21.Kano has a number of kid-friendly computer and coding kits already, which have previously included a Harry Potter-themed coding kit with wand and a computer running a Kano OS operating system.Update, June 24, 2019 at 1:07 p.m. PT: Clarifies that Minecraft: Education Edition is not playable on the Kano PC with purchase of the computer. See Itlast_img read more

Bangladesh police ask secular bloggers not to cross limit

first_imgWith four secular bloggers being killed by suspected Islamists in Bangladesh in recent months, police here have asked secular writers not to “cross the limit” and write anything which hurts religious beliefs of others.“Do not cross the limit. Do not hurt anyone’s religious belief,” Inspector General of Police AKM Shahidul Hoque said as investigators struggled to nab the killers of secular blogger Niloy Chakrabarty Neel who was hacked to death at his flat here on Friday. Also Read – Nine hurt in accident at fireworks show in French resortThe “freethinkers” should keep in mind that hurting someone’s religious sentiment is a criminal offence, Bdnews quoted Hoque as saying.On the killing of blogger Neel, he said police were investigating it “with top priority”.He is the fourth blogger to have been killed since February this year. Hours after the gruesome attack, Ansar-Al -Islam, the Bangladesh chapter of al-Qaeda in the Indian subcontinent, claimed responsibility for killing 40-year-old Neel but police said involvement of the banned outfit cannot be confirmed yet. Also Read – Pakistan Army ‘fully prepared’ to face any challenge: Army spokesmanApart from Neel, other bloggers killed this year are Avijit Roy, Washiqur Rahman and Ananta Bijoy Das.Meanwhile, a team of the FBI of the US met local detectives in Dhaka to share their technical expertise in investigating such cases, Deputy Commissioner (Detective Branch) Mahbub Alam of Dhaka Metropolitan Police told reporters after the meeting.Alams said they also talked about the progress of investigation into the murder of secular writer Avijit Roy, a naturalised US citizen.last_img read more

Biometric Information Privacy Act It is now illegal for Amazon Facebook or

first_imgOn 25th January, the Illinois Supreme Court passed a unanimous ruling which states that, when companies collect biometric data like fingerprints or face prints without informed opt-in consent, they can be sued. This can be done even without proof of concrete injuries- like identity fraud or physical harm. The law known as the Biometric Information Privacy Act, requires that companies explicitly inform a person about what biometric data they will collect, and also how the data will be stored and utilized by the company. The data includes information like fingerprints, facial scans, iris scans, or other biological information. Next, the company has to obtain prior consent from that person before capturing these details. A point to be noted here is that, while other states only allow attorneys general to sue companies, the Illinois BIPA law gives individuals the right to sue companies. Afterwhich, they can collect damages of $1,000 (the amount increases to $5,000, if the court finds a company deliberately or recklessly flouted the law). Six Flags v Rosenbach According to FastCompany, the decision was taken in a landmark lawsuit against the theme park Six Flags, who recorded the thumbprint of a 14-year-old boy without notice or written consent, while issuing him a season pass in 2014. Six Flags did not notify the boy or his mother, Stacy Rosenbach, about obtaining his fingerprints. She sued Six Flags for violation of the BIPA law and in its defense, Six Flags made the case that because Rosenbach couldn’t demonstrate that taking his fingerprints had done any “harm” to the boy (example: no data breach or security problem), the company wasn’t liable for damages. According to the Electronic Frontier foundation, “EFF, along with ACLU, CDT, the Chicago Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation, PIRG, and Lucy Parsons Labs, filed an amicus curiae brief urging the Illinois Supreme Court to adopt a robust interpretation of BIPA. The Illinois Supreme Court agreed with us and soundly rejected the defendants’ argument that BIPA required a person to show an injury beyond loss of statutory privacy rights”.  On Friday the state’s Supreme Court ruled that Six Flags had, indeed, violated the law and would need to pay the boy damages, in spite of no “harm” shown. The ruling comes as an example in Illinois that if a company violates a citizen’s privacy without any prior notice or consent and the citizen sues, the plaintiff doesn’t need to demonstrate an additional harm for the law to protect the user. BIPA sets an example for similar lawsuits The Six Flags ruling builds a stronger case for other ongoing lawsuits, including one against Facebook in which consumers claimed that Facebook violated a state privacy law by using facial recognition technology on their uploaded photographs without their consent. Facebook is fighting back by saying consumers should have to show that the lawbreaking practice caused ‘additional harm’ beyond a mere violation. Google also faced a similar lawsuit on Thursday, where two Illinois residents allege that the company “failed to obtain consent from anyone when it introduced its facial recognition technology.” Just last month, Google won the dismissal of a lawsuit it has been facing since 2016 for allegedly scanning and saving the biometric data of a woman, captured unwillingly in 11 photos taken on Android by a Google Photos user. As per Bloomberg, the lawsuit was dismissed by a judge in Chicago, who found that the plaintiff didn’t suffer “concrete injuries”. Senior staff counsel Rebecca Glenberg of the ACLU of Illinois, said in a statement that  “Your biometric information belongs to you and should not be left to corporate interests who want to collect detailed information about you for advertising and other commercial purposes.” What does this mean to the tech industry? According to Illinois.org, while facial recognition technology and biometric does have the potential to simplify life of citizens, the BIPA may affect technological innovation overall. The litigation may have the potential to drive up costs- on both ends of the spectrum. Businesses like Apple, who have demonstrated the importance of biometric technology, will have to take extra precautions to comply with the BIPA. In case the law is violated, there is the expense of class-action lawyers and litigants. They may simply decide against hiring people in Illinois because of the expense and hassle. It would be interesting to see companies coming up with a kind of framework that would safeguard them against violation of the BIPA as well as put citizens at rest about the way their data is handled/used. You can head over to Electronic Frontier Foundation’s official post for more insights on this news. Read Next ACLU files lawsuit against 11 federal criminal and immigration enforcement agencies for disclosure of information on government hackingThe district of Columbia files a lawsuit against Facebook for the Cambridge Analytica scandalIBM faces age discrimination lawsuit after laying off thousands of older workers, Bloomberg reportslast_img read more