Future Faces: Jordi Murphy and Koree Britton

first_img Jordi Murphy(Leinster)Jordi Murphy (inpho)You were born in Barcelona. Is your family Irish?Yes. In the late 1980s my parents moved to Spain and my sister and I were born there, but we came back when I was nine.Was that when you first played rugby?I didn’t know what it was until I went to Blackrock College, but I got into it really quickly. I can play all across the back row but primarily I’m a No 7.Who are your mentors?At school, my coach Frank Macken was a big help. I moved up the ranks with him and I still see him a lot. It was great to learn from Mike Ruddock with Ireland U20 too.How would you describe your playing style?I love making tackles and steals and linking with the backs. I definitely consider myself a mobile back-row and a bit of a pain for the other team.What is your next aim?I’d love to play in the Heineken Cup. I’ve been in the Leinster squad twice but not got on yet.What interests do you have outside rugby?I’m studying for a degree in business and entrepreneurship.RW Verdict: This Ireland age-group international, now 21, is starting to make his mark in distinguished company at Leinster.Koree Britton(Gloucester) Saving grace: Rugby saved BrittonTell us about your rugby background.I was born in Torquay and my dad, Dave, took me to Dartmouth minis when I was four. He played prop for them. I moved on to Kingsbridge, then Exeter Chiefs from the age of about ten until I was 17, then joined Gloucester.What do you like about being a hooker?I like to be in the mix of things. The head-to-head battle with your opposite number appeals to me.Who influenced you as you came through?My dad has been key. Through all the trials and tribulations of being picked and dropped by clubs and England age groups, he’s encouraged me to stick at it.You turned 20 this year. Did you miss out on normal teenage life?I don’t think I’ve missed out on a lot. Rugby has kept me on the straight and narrow, when some people I know have ended up in prison. I have a good life.What has been your favourite Gloucester game so far?The recent one against Leicester (Gloucester won 27-21 despite going down to 13 men late on). We all worked as a unit towards the end to get the result we wanted. It was by far the best atmosphere I’ve experienced and the noise echoing around the ground made me smile.What do you do in your spare time?When I can I like to get back to Devon and go sea-fishing with my dad.RW Verdict: A Grand Slam winner with England U20, Britton has strength and nerves of steel, as Leicester discovered. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS GLOUCESTER, ENGLAND – AUGUST 17: Koree Britton of Gloucester poses for a portrait at the photocall held at Kingsholm Stadium on August 17, 2012 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) This article appeared in the January 2013 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad.last_img read more

Innovations in Aviva Premiership coverage

first_imgChief Executive of Premiership Rugby, Mark McCafferty said of the innovations: “There are some hugely engaging and articulate players, coaches and Directors of Rugby in Aviva Premiership Rugby – through some of these innovations we hope to bring club rugby union to a new audience while embracing our loyal supporters.”Beyond this, Premiership Rugby have also announced that confirming that every Premiership match in the 2013-14 season will be watched over by a Television Match Official (TMO). Previously, there were only TMOs at matches presented live on television, but now an official will be present at all 135 Premiership matches this season.Helping hand: All referees will be supported by a TMOThis season the Premiership TMO will be is part of a worldwide trial that will enable referees to: “consult with the TMO to review up to two phases (rucks or mauls) before the ball is grounded in the act of scoring” and to “call on the TMO to advise on incidents of possible foul play.” Stars of TV: Fans will see and hear a lot more from the stars of the Aviva Premiership through BT this seasonAlan DymockAVIVA PREMIERSHIP and BT Sport have joined forces to come up with a series of on-screen innovations for their first season together.Next week sees the start of BT Sport’s coverage of rugby after signing an unprecedented £152m-deal to show Premiership rugby and after a six-month consultation period with all 12 clubs and their officials they have come up with a new TV strategy.Conspicuous: Bayfield will chat pitchsideThe changes will see BT operating cameras in each team’s dressing room as well as a ‘kicking tee cam’ and ‘lineout cam’.In terms of in-game interviews, BT will have what they are dubbing, a “pre-match pitch walk” during which BT Sport reporters (Sarra Elgan and Martin Bayfield) will interview players during their warm-up. There will be interviews with coaches during play as well as half-time talks with players and coaches. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS WORCESTER, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 16: Referee Greg Garner awards a penalty try during the Aviva Premiership match between Worcester Warriors and Northampton Saints at Sixways Stadium on February 16, 2013 in Worcester, England. (Photo by Matthew Lewis/Getty Images) Such changes will be visible during the first live match of the season with Newcastle Falcons hosting Bath on Friday, September 6. The match will be live on BT Sport.What do you think of these changes? Are you a fan of the innovation and the increased TMO presence? Let us know on twitter: @Rugbyworldmag, or via our facebook page.last_img read more

GKIPA Championship blog: Round 15 wrap

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Greene King IPA Championship: It is very tight at the top as the battle for the play-off places intensifiesby Richard GraingerTwo points separate the top four sides with eight rounds remaining in the first stage of the Greene King IPA Championship. And with London Scottish trailing the pack by just five points, it looks like a five horse race for the play-offs. Exiles’ power and pace too much for TitansLondon Welsh 47, Rotherham Titans 16The Exiles picked this top-of-the-league clash to bounce back from defeat at Plymouth with their most ebullient performance of the season. Rotherham, who began the day at the top of the table, surrendered a ten-match winning streak to a Welsh side anxious to put memories of their nightmare trip to Devon behind them.The Exiles took the game to Rotherham from the off and had complete control by the interval with tries from Nathan Trevett, Richard Thorpe, James Tideswell and the prolific Seb Stegmann to take a 26-9 lead into the dressing room.Stegmann added a second after the turnaround, and tries from lock Peter Browne and Alan Awcock took the Exiles close to the half-century mark. The league’s top scorers could only muster three penalties from an off-form Juan Pablo Socini and a late consolation try from Marshall Gadd.But the question remains for head coach Justin Burrell: which Exiles side will take the pitch against Cornish Pirates at the Mennaye Field next weekend — the one who dispatched Leeds and Rotherham or the one who were unraveled at Brickfields? Sleepy Scottish still too good for plucky PlymouthLondon Scottish 38, Plymouth Albion 27London Scottish were another side to establish a commanding position only for early dominance to dissipate, as Albion fought back at the Athletic Ground on Saturday. The hosts were good for their 19-0 first quarter lead then went to sleep and allowed Plymouth to hit back with 27 unanswered points either side of half-time. But ultimately the Scottish woke from their slumber and killed off any hopes of back-to-back wins against top five opponents for the Plymouth. Yellow cards for Rhys Oakley and Lloyd Fairbrother in the final quarter made their task considerably easier. Haag lines: Martin Haag was disappointedJersey 17, Nottingham 13 And finally…Moseley’s predicted draw against the Cornish Pirates at Billesley Common on Friday night will have to wait, as the pitch was deemed unplayable.center_img Burroughs buries Green and Whites with last gasp tryAs if things weren’t bad enough for Ealing, they also had to digest the news that a last-minute try for Jersey meant the gap between the relegation battlers has grown to six points.Head coach Martin Haag’s men looked good for the points leading 10-13 at St Peter on Saturday, until local man Jack Burroughs crossed in the corner in the final play.“We should have been further ahead,” said Haag, whose side played into the gale in the first period. “The boys played exceptionally well in the first half.”Haag didn’t think much of the decision to show prop Harry Williams yellow, but if Matt Jarvis had brought his kicking boots, Burroughs’ try would only have left Jersey with a losing bonus point. Brave Blues’ fightback not enoughBedford 19, Bristol 32Bristol sit in fourth slot but with a game in hand thanks to this win over Bedford at the Memorial Ground on Saturday; but it wasn’t as comfortable as the score suggests.The hosts raced to a 15-0 lead after 27 minutes only for the Blues to hit back with three tries and briefly seize a 15-19 lead with 30 minutes left on the clock. However, director of rugby Andy Robinson’s men kicked on with three more unanswered tries in the final quarter to bank their tenth league win. Trailfinders’ trouble deepens as Carnegie canter clearEaling Trailfinders 11, Leeds Carnegie 46Leeds, who are now tied with Bristol and Rotherham on 52 points, were another side to notch seven tries.Trailfinders were briefly in contention when Phil Chesters, the league’s fifth highest try scorer, collected Ben Ward’s cross-kick to touch down in the corner and reduce an early deficit to 5-7. Thereafter, it was all Carnegie who, despite the miserable conditions at Vallis Way on Saturday, played attractive rugby to help inflict a milestone on Ealing that they will quickly want to forget: this drubbing, brought up 500 points conceded this season.Ealing will not be putting roses on the table for Bedford’s Valentine’s Day visit to Vallis Way, as this is a match they must win if they are to entertain any realistic hopes of Championship survival. NOTTINGHAM, ENGLAND – AUGUST 16: Martin Haag of Nottingham Rugby looks on during the pre season friendly match between Nottingham Rugby and London Irish at Meadow Lane on August 16, 2013 in Nottingham, England. (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images) last_img read more

The greatest hookers of all time: Bismarck du Plessis

first_img Major teams: Free State Cheetahs, Natal, Sharks, Montpellier 

Country: South Africa
Test span: 2007-2015South Africa caps 79 (50 starts)
Test points: 55 (11T)Stuck behind the sizeable figure of skipper John Smit, Bismarck du Plessis only accrued two starts in the first 14 Tests of his career.While those cameos involved an appearance in the 2007 Word Cup final triumph over England, a year of frustration evidently fuelled a fire of ambition.When controversial Springbok head coach Peter de Villiers decided to shift Smit to tighthead in 2008, it was partly because du Plessis had outgrown his role as an impact replacement.Dynamic and abrasive with exceptional breakdown nous, the God-fearing farmer’s boy from Bethlehem in the Free State – who is also a qualified insurance broker – set about establishing himself as one of the most respected hookers on the planet.The 2009 series against the British & Irish Lions offered an impressive foundation, du Plessis playing all 80 minutes of the first two Tests and helping to carve out an unassailable 2-0 lead thanks to a pair of menacing, obdurate performances. Bismarck du Plessis ousted his captain John Smit, out of the South Africa hooker role in 2008, then dominated as one of the world’s best “For me, Bismarck is comfortably the best hooker in the world,” he says. “Nobody else can hold a flame to him. His throwing is outstanding, his scrummaging huge and his work-rate around the park immense.”For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A 32-29 defeat of New Zealand in Hamilton completed a hat-trick of wins over the All Blacks and added that season’s Tri-Nations title for the Springboks.Du Plessis has had elder brother Jannie for support the whole way. The pair debuted for South Africa in the same game against the Wallabies in 2007 and shared seven years together at the Sharks as well, both announcing they were to leave Durban in June 2015. Both have since joined French Top 14 side Montpellier, where they helped best Harlequins to clinch the European Rugby Challenge Cup.In recent times, Adriaan Strauss emerged as another international rival and red-mist moments brought Bismarck bans for alleged eye gouging and kicking during his career.According to Sharks coach Gary Gold however, du Plessis’s overall reputation is unblemished. Bismarck du Plessis taking on the NZ defence TAGS: The Greatest Players last_img read more

Rugby’s Greatest: Martin Johnson

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: The Greatest Players Introducing the English loosehead prop, who has made one… Rugby World Cup Greatest Players Major teams: Leicester, King CountryCountry: EnglandTest span: 1993-2003England caps: 84 (82 starts)Lions caps: 8 (8 starts)Test points: 10 (2T) His ability to read a game whilst it unfolded, communicating to team-mates the course of action most likely to bring a try two or three phases down the line, was remarkable. “His rugby brain was a huge component in making him a great captain,” said long-time Tigers team-mate Geordan Murphy.In 2001 Johnson became the first player to captain the Lions on two occasions and two years later, following a second England Grand Slam, he was part of a rearguard action that defeated the All Blacks on their own soil for the first time since 1973. John Eales called his performance “among the best ever by a lock forward”. Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Rugby’s Greatest: Jason Leonard England Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Collapse Martin Johnson celebrates winning the Rugby World Cup in 2003 center_img After driving England to their defining moment in Sydney, Johnson retired at the end of that season. Despite his lack of coaching experience, he became England manager and achieved a Six Nations title in 2011, before resigning after a disappointing World Cup later that year. Rugby’s Greatest: Jason Leonard Adam Hathaway takes a look at the best… Rugby World Cup Greatest Players After a disastrous home World Cup in 2015,… Expand England Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Expand Rugby’s Greatest: Martin JohnsonWhen he held aloft the William Webb Ellis trophy in 2003, it marked his 39th Test as captain, of which England won 34. His leadership credentials had been apparent since 1997 when Sir Ian McGeechan, who wanted a towering Lions captain to be able to look down on Springbok skipper Gary Teichmann, picked the Leicester lock to lead the side into what ended up as a triumphant series. Johnson had made his name four years earlier in 1993 on the Lions tour of New Zealand – after just one cap for England.The land of the long white cloud had already had a profound effect on Johnson. As a 19-year-old he had been approached by All Black legend Colin Meads to try out for King Country and spent two years there, honing his craft. He met his future wife there before returning to the UK.Solihull-born, Johnson had been raised in Market Harborough and even had an early foray in American Football but on his return from New Zealand he continued a 16-year love affair with Welford Road, playing 362 games for the club. In a decorated domestic career Johnson led them to four Premiership titles and two Heineken Cups.last_img read more

60 Years of Rugby World: Rugby in Pictures

first_img“The hardest thing was the defensive aspect (Bath lost 82-6). Union has learnt so much from league and it has had a huge impact. We couldn’t get to grips with the defensive stuff. We were all absolutely blowing because it was so different and if you speak to the league boys they will say the same about the game at Twickenham (Bath won 44-19).Code cracking: Jon Sleightholme breaks away from Jason Robinson (Getty Images)“It is a different type of fitness to what you are used to. In the league game we were really struggling to get back into alignment, we were all over the place. At half-time we said, ‘We can’t learn this, let’s play our stuff like we would in union’.“It was a lot better in the second half but I am sure Wigan took their foot off the gas a little bit. We just tried to play union against them but they were physical specimens.“It was a heck of an experience and it broke down the barriers between the two games which had been there for over 100 years. There was massive respect from us and I think it came back in the other direction.”New Zealand’s 1998 Women’s World Cup winFormer Black Ferns flanker Melodie Robinson: “This was a super special event because it was the first time we were officially selected to represent New Zealand at a Rugby World Cup. Even better it was in Amsterdam, which was a location none of us thought we’d ever get to, let alone play rugby there.“We had an official wardrobe, just like the All Blacks, and these massive Canterbury Rugby coats that looked like sleeping bags. A photographer was following us around to catch every moment and we were in a hotel out in the sticks with the Welsh team, who were super fun.Winning line-up: The Black Ferns perform the anthem at the 1998 World Cup (Getty Images)“But most importantly we were ruthless in our attitude. Training was as intense as games. We were playing attractive, wide rugby, with tries aplenty.“We beat England in the semi-final. Then came the very physical, muscular USA in the final. You don’t ever remember much when you’re playing a very intense match. Even when the whistle goes and you’ve won, your emotions are numbed. Numb because there was so much emotion in the build-up to this very moment.“When you win, it takes a while to set in and then it hits when you see yourselves in the paper or you get home to congratulations from your family.”Argentina’s third-place finish at the 2007 World CupArgentina shook up the whole rugby landscape at RWC 2007. First they beat France in the opening pool game and then they triumphed over the hosts in the bronze medal play-off to finish third at the World Cup.Delight: Argentina captain Agustin Pichot celebrates finishing third at RWC 2007 (Getty Images)Pumas fly-half Juan Martin Hernandez told World Rugby recently: “France 2007 was incredible. Beating France at home was a start, but the team had been growing steadily in the previous four years.”Their success at that tournament paved the way to them joining Australia, New Zealand and South Africa in the Rugby Championship.New Zealand’s 2011 World Cup winFormer All Blacks captain Richie McCaw: “We were on the ground for an hour or so (after the final whistle), got cold, and went into the changing room and that’s when I thought, ‘Man, I’m absolutely exhausted’.Tiredness hits: Richie McCaw with the NZ coaches after winning the 2011 final (Getty Images)“We had to walk back across the field to get to the press conference. I was with Steve Hansen and said, ‘Mate, I’m gonna need a drink or something because I’m going to fall over here’. It didn’t hit me for an hour. Once it did I realised how exhausted I was and what we’d achieved.” History makers: Toulouse players with their trophies after the 1996 Heineken Cup final victory (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. 60 Years of Rugby World: Rugby in PicturesRugby World magazine celebrates its 60th birthday this year and the celebratory edition features players past and present recalling significant moments in the history of the game.Here is a taste of the ‘Rugby in Pictures’ content – pick up a copy of the magazine for more – plus a couple of additional moments we wanted to highlight.South Africa’s 1969-70 tour to the UK and IrelandFormer Springboks No 8 Tommy Bedford: “There wouldn’t have been many rugby tours like that. You had to try to cope with (anti-apartheid) demonstrations, which was completely foreign. I had tried to warn the South African team and they had never experienced it and they thought it wouldn’t be a problem. I said, ‘Hang on chaps, I have seen demonstrations for three years here in the UK (as a student)’.Boks protest: An anti-apartheid march on their way to Twickenham (Getty Images)“My great regret about that tour is, as a South African having spent years in the UK and being able to travel, that sort of freedom and broadening of outlook that we were denied in South Africa, was denied. I’d have liked 30 Springboks to come back to South Africa with a similar experience (of the UK) to what I had.“If we had come back having been broadened in our outlook all sorts of things might have been broadened. That was the great tragedy and the game staggered on. It took a whole lot longer to get things done.“On that tour you felt the whole world was against you – instead of being outward looking you became inward looking and that is one the big disappointments for me.”New Zealand’s 1987 World Cup winFormer All Blacks hooker Sean Fitzpatrick: “It was an opportunity for us to get people back watching rugby. We trained at schools and really took the game back to the locals.Middle man: John Drake, Sean Fitzpatrick and Steve McDowell at RWC 1987 (Getty Images)“We got billeted in the Wairarapa. We played Argentina in the last pool game in Wellington and Brian Lochore (coach) said we are going to head to my home village and have a few pints in my local pub.“We went into the pub and it was full of all the locals then Brian said, ‘Fitzpatrick and (Richard) Loe you are with the Murphy family’. We are like, ‘What?’ We had to go and stay with them for two nights – it was bloody fantastic.”FIND OUT WHAT’S INSIDE RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE’S 60TH ANNIVERSARY EDITIONTriumph: Emile Ntamack lifts the first Heineken Cup trophy (Getty Images)Toulouse’s Heineken Cup win in 1996Toulouse made history on 7 January 1996 when they beat Cardiff 21-18 – thanks to a Christophe Deylaud penalty in extra-time – to win the first-ever Heineken Cup.The French giants have gone on to lift European club rugby’s biggest prize a further three times but what really stands out from their inaugural triumph is the trophies.Each player received an individual gong to go with the main trophy (see top image), which looks very different to the modern version!Bath v Wigan cross-code challenge in 1996Former Bath and England wing Jon Sleightholme: “It was a very strange build-up. We played Leicester at the weekend in the old Pilkington Cup final and played the rugby league game three or four days after.“We had very limited preparation. Clive Griffiths came to do some league sessions with us but we couldn’t do a great deal and after winning the cup final against Leicester, the boys celebrated in style until Monday.center_img Memorable moments in rugby history, including the recollections of players themselves LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Lillibridges, Bergstrom honored as Heroes of Camping

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY General Convention 2015, Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem People AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Servicecenter_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Hero of Camping Ministry awards were presented to the Rt. Rev. Gary Lillibridge, bishop of West Texas, and his wife, Mrs. Catherine Lillibridge, and Canon Peter Bergstrom, outgoing executive director of Episcopal Camps and Conference Centers. Photo: Laura Shaver/Diocese of West Texas[Diocese of San Diego – Salt Lake City] The Rt. Rev. Brian Prior, bishop of Minnesota, June 28 presented the Episcopal Camps and Conference Centers’ Hero of Camping Ministry Award to the Rt. Rev. Gary Lillibridge, bishop of West Texas, and his wife, Mrs. Catherine Lillibridge.And in a delightful twist at the end of his presentation to the Lillibridges, Prior also gave Canon Peter Bergstrom a Hero of Camping Ministry Award. Bergstrom retires this year as executive director of ECCC, an organization that advocates for Episcopal camps and retreat centers throughout the church.Bishop Lillibridge grew up attending Camp Capers, the Episcopal camp in the Diocese of West Texas, which former Presiding Bishop Edmund Browning attended. More recently, the diocese acquired property called Mustang Island at Corpus Christi, which has grown into a retreat spot for Episcopal families. Bishop Lillibridge realized that these retreats and vacations encouraged families in their involvement with and commitment to the Episcopal Church, and to their spiritual growth as a family. The Lillibridges understand that the camp experience helps people move from the fringe of the parish into the center, because camp has been an integral part of their own life experience. Under the bishop’s direction, the diocese allocated significant funds to operate and expand Mustang Island. The diocese also developed a wilderness property in Colorado for teen adventures, Duncan Park. Since 2011 Bishop Lillibridge managed the visionary and advocacy council for ECCC; in that role he worked tirelessly to equip camp and conference center staff to be their own advocates in the greater Episcopal Church.Catherine Lillibridge has been a camper, camp staff, retreat leader, fundraiser and supporter. Her ministry has been a partnership with Bishop Lillibridge throughout their marriage.Bergstrom said that “Gary and Catherine Lillibridge not only have a lifelong passion for camping and retreat ministry but they truly and deeply understand how important that ministry is to the development of the future leaders of our churches and dioceses.” He also noted that the Lillibridges have invested significant financial support in the ministry of camping “so that it flourishes and therefore the diocese flourishes.”“Camp is my first language,” said Prior, who was the director of Camp Cross during his 14-year career as a priest in Spokane, Washington. Prior and his wife met and were married at camp. He said that the “camping ministry was foundational in [his] formation.”Since becoming a bishop five years ago in Minnesota, Prior has grown the Episcopal Church in Minnesota’s camping ministries. He will assume the responsibilities of chairman of the visionary and advocacy council for ECCC when Lillibridge’s term ends.In presenting the surprise award to Bergstrom, Prior said, “Peter is committed. He’s a legend of camping ministry. He’s second to none in what he’s done for the organization, structure and bringing people in the camping ministry together.”Bergstrom provided the organization with “vision, direction and leadership development,” said William Slocumb, ECCC director of operations. He credits Canon Bergstrom with shaping his leadership capabilities: Slocumb assumes the role of director of ECCC in 2016.Ashley Graham-Wilcox, director of communications for ECCC, said she and Slocumb met Bergstrom at Camp Stevens in the Diocese of Los Angeles and San Diego, where he was the executive director for 40 years. He retired in 2012.“I’ve known Bill Slocumb since he was a young intern at Camp Stevens, right out of college,” mused Bergstrom. “There is nobody that is more open and friendly, and who cares about camps and retreat centers and their staff than Bill. He knows them all, has visited them all and wants to help them thrive in their ministries.”The Hero of Camping Ministry Award is the brainchild of Bergstrom. In an address to the House of Bishops Bergstrom said, “Summer camp is more important today than ever, as so many children spend most of their waking hours indoors in front of one screen or another. Direct connection to nature, to God’s creation, is important in so many ways, as is really living together with other children from a variety of ethnicities and economic backgrounds.”The visually striking award, which resembles an ice-carved mountain, has been conferred on three other members of the Episcopal community: the Rt. Rev. Thomas M. Shaw in 2009, and the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori and Mr. Richard Schori in 2012.— Hannah Wilder is director of communications for the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego. Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA General Convention, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group By Hannah WilderPosted Jun 30, 2015 Lillibridges, Bergstrom honored as Heroes of Campinglast_img read more

Multimedia: Scenes from Anglican Consultative Council meeting

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release April 16, 2016 at 12:44 pm Lovely to Our Lady of Walsingham in Cathedral… Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Anglican Consultative Council, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Multimedia: Scenes from Anglican Consultative Council meeting The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Video TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 center_img By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Matthew DaviesPosted Apr 16, 2016 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service — Lusaka, Zambia] The Anglican Consultative Council’s 16th meeting at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross began on April 8 and closes April 19. Members of the ACC-16 meeting pose on the cathedral steps. Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas is in the front row far right. The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings – president of the House of Deputies, is in the third row, fourth from left. Deputy Rosalie Ballentine from the Virgin Islands is in the fifth row, third from left. Formed in 1969, the ACC includes clergy and lay people, as well as bishops, among its delegates. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceIn this detail from the ACC group photo, Deputy Rosalie Ballentine, the Episcopal Church’s lay ACC member, is in the upper left and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, ACC clergy member and president of the House of Deputies, is at lower right. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceIn this detail from the ACC group photo, Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, Episcopal Church ACC bishop member, in at the far right in the front row. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceDeputy Rosalie Ballentine, the Episcopal Church’s lay ACC member, has been sitting at the same table with Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby during the meeting. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, ACC clergy member and the president of the House of Deputies, speaks with her tablemates during a small-group discussion. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceDiocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, left, participates April 8 in a reading of the Book of Ruth. The story of Ruth has been the basis of ACC-16’s daily Bible study. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceArchbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby listens to a presentation. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThree young Zambian men dance their faith during a presentation April 16 on local ministry in Lusaka. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe youth contingent at ACC-16 presents “Thoughts from Young People” April 16 during a presentation about youth in the church. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe Cathedral of the Holy Cross has played a significant role in the life of Zambia in the 51 years since independence, including hosting major gatherings in the early 1990s of groups in conflict over the effort to return to multiparty democracy. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe light-filled nave of the Cathedral of the Holy Cross has been the setting for ACC-16. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceA choir member brought her baby with her to noonday Eucharist on April 15. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe Lady Chapel in the Cathedral of the Holy Cross has a shrine to Mary and her child. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceA carved statue of Jesus stands in a light-filled corner of the Cathedral of the Holy Cross. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThis striking crucifix hangs over the altar in another cathedral chapel. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe face on the crucifix gives a different view of Jesus. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC ACC16, Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Comments (1) Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Fr Jim Rosenthal says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Communiqué: Anglican-Lutheran International Coordinating Committee

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Anglican Communion, Ecumenical & Interreligious Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican-Lutheran International Coordinating Committee (ALICC) held its fourth meeting in Adelaide, Australia, 25 to 31 May 2016, under the leadership of Bishop Michael Pryse of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and Bishop Tim Harris of the Anglican Church of Australia, co-chairs.The meeting was hosted by the Anglican Communion and the Diocese of Adelaide. The Committee warmly appreciated the practical, technical and friendly support from St Barnabas College and the Diocese of Adelaide.During this meeting the Committee substantially completed a daily devotional resource called Grace upon Grace: Voices around the World. This book will be available late in 2016, in both hardcopy and online as a PDF-file. It is intended to assist Lutherans and Anglicans to commemorate together the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Reformation. This material illustrates the constant need for all churches be open to reform and renewal by the Holy Spirit. This is a six-week daily devotional resource, with contributions by Anglicans and Lutherans; men and women; lay and ordained fromaround the world. The themes are:• God’s mission in the world (Mission Dei)• Liberated by God’s Grace• Salvation – not for sale• Human beings – not for sale• Creation – not for sale• Freed to serve (Diakonia)Each day has its own theme, a Scripture passage and a reflection. In addition, there is a Eucharistic liturgy, inviting Anglicans and Lutherans to worship together. It is the Committee’s hope that this resource will be used by Anglicans and Lutherans in joint groups as well as by individuals. Above all, it is an encouragement for us to pray for and with one another.As part of its task to be a catalyst, the Committee was delighted to note the forthcoming theological conferences on Grace in Hong Kong in September 2017, organized by Ming Hua Theological College and the Lutheran Theological Seminary.This year, the Committee also continued its work of mapping Anglican and Lutheran relationships around the world and noted with delight progress at various levels, in different parts of the world. In order to fulfill its role to be a catalyst for such relationships, the committee will during 2016 complete a resource entitled Deepening of Relationships: Opportunities for Communion – A Guide Map. This material illustrates stages in relationships between Anglicans and Lutherans, provides different scenarios, as well as lists the various agreements already existing between our two churches.During this meeting the Committee explored options for a forthcoming website. This will host Anglican – Lutheran resources, including the devotional material.The Committee appreciated a fruitful meeting at Bishop’s Court, hosted at the kind and generous invitation by Archbishop Dr Jeffrey and Mrs Lindy Driver. The meeting was attended by members of the Australian Lutheran College, representatives of national and state Lutheran Church leaders, local Anglican Bishops, the chair of the General Synod Ecumenical Relations Commission, Archbishop Dr Phillip Aspinall, and the Secretary of the South Australian Council of Churches, Ms Geraldine Hawkes.This meeting offered an opportunity for the committee to learn about the Australian dialogue between Anglicans and Lutherans and to encourage deepening relationships. Preceding the meeting, we gathered in the chapel of the Australian Lutheran College for joint Evening Prayer.In addition, the members of ALICC visited the Diocesan Synod of the Diocese of The Murray at which they were warmly received. On Sunday, the members of the Committee visited St Matthew’s Church, Kensington, a local Anglican Parishes, where we were enriched by attending the celebration of the Eucharist and joining the members of the congregation for fellowship and friendly conversations afterwards.This meeting was the last meeting for the Anglican Lutheran International Coordinating Committee (2013-2016).Members of ALICC:Anglicans:The Rt Revd Dr Tim Harris, Australia, (Co-Chair)The Revd Dalcy Dlamini, Swaziland, Southern AfricaThe Revd Augusta Leung, Hong Kong (Unable to attend)The Revd Canon John Lindsay, ScotlandThe Revd Canon Dr John Gibaut, Anglican Communion Office (Co-Secretary)The Revd Neil Vigers, (Anglican Communion Office staff)Lutherans:The Rev. Bishop Dr Michael Pryse, Canada (Co-Chair)The Rev. Joyceline Fred Njama, TanzaniaThe Ven. Helene T. Steed, Sweden and IrelandThe Rev. Sonia Skupch, ArgentinaThe Rev. Prof. Dr Nicholas Tai, Hong Kong ChinaThe Rev. Anne Burghardt, The Lutheran World Federation (Co-Secretary) Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Communiqué: Anglican-Lutheran International Coordinating Committee Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Posted Jun 15, 2016 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

La CDSP prepara a los seminaristas para la vida pública

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Episcopal News Service] En la Escuela de Teología Eclesiástica del Pacífico (CDSP por su sigla en inglés), de Berkeley, California, preparar a futuros sacerdotes para dirigir congregaciones en el mundo de hoy también significa adiestrarlos para la vida pública.Hace dos años, el seminario comenzó una revisión de su currículo, concentrando su Programa de Maestría en Teología en tres conceptos cristianos fundamentales: misión, discipulado y evangelización. Junto con eso, [la institución] se comprometió a educar a los seminaristas en las destrezas de la reflexión crítica, el análisis contextual y la conversación pública, para las cuales desempeña un papel el adiestrarles en organización comunitaria.El Muy Rdo. W. Mark Richardson, presidente y decano de la Escuela de Teología Eclesiástica del Pacífico, durante el adiestramiento dela Fundación de Áreas Industriales el año pasado. Foto/CDSP.“Estamos tratando de hacer un cambio en nuestro currículo y buscando un mayor ajuste entre la vida de la fe y la vida pública”, dijo el Muy Rdo. W. Mark Richardson, presidente y decano de la CDSP, en una entrevista en su oficina con Episcopal News Service.“Preparar líderes seguros de sí en la interrelación de la fe y la vida pública… esa es una manera, creemos, de abordar en el siglo XXI la cuestión de la misión”, añadió.Para muchos episcopales, resulta claro que ser la Iglesia en el mundo significa estar presente en las comunidades y asumir un interés activo en mejorar las vidas de las personas. En los últimos años, algunos obispos episcopales han llamado a su clero, cada vez más, no sólo a ser pastores, sino [también] a ser empresarios, teólogos públicos y organizadores de comunidades basadas en la fe.“Los obispos están diciendo cada vez más que la organización comunitaria es algo bueno”, dijo la Rda. Susanna Singer, profesora asociada de Desarrollo Ministerial y directora del Programa Doctoral de Ministerio de la DCSP. “Siempre hemos tenido a nuestros seminaristas haciendo educación pastoral clínica en hospitales para aprender las destrezas pastorales a profundidad, pero algunos obispos empezaron a decir que queremos que aprendan destrezas organizativas a profundidad”.La fe cristiana, añadió ella, tiene que ver con la visión de Dios de un florecimiento para la humanidad y el cosmos. “Significa que el cuerpo de Cristo, que somos nosotros ahora, tiene que salir afuera y participar en las comunidades en que vivimos porque es allí donde va hacerse realidad el sueño de Dios”.Para adiestrar a sus seminaristas, la CDSP recurrió a la ayuda de la Fundación de Áreas Industriales (IAF, por su sigla en inglés), una red de organizaciones de carácter religioso y comunitario que ha adiestrado a líderes y capacitado a comunidades desde 1940.En 2013, el seminario y la IAF empezaron a ofrecer un curso de Organización para el Ministerio Público, de una semana de duración, que se basa en la preparación nacional de líderes de la IAF en el contexto religioso, educacional, laboral y comunitario. Lo que antes era un curso optativo de seis días, a partir de este otoño es un requisito para los nuevos seminaristas.“La intención es adiestrar a personas normales para proporcionarles tanto un marco conceptual para pensar sobre los temas del poder y el egoísmo y el liderazgo, como algunas habilidades prácticas para relacionarse con personas que son diferentes a uno en el ancho mundo”, dijo Anna Eng, principal organizadora de la IAF en el área de la Bahía [de San Francisco], en una entrevista telefónica con ENS.Los participantes aprenden, añadió ella, a dirigir una reunión y a tener conversaciones productivas. Muchos líderes de la IAF provienen de un contexto religioso, de manera que tiene sentido asociarse con el seminario, lo cual, además del adiestramiento práctico, facilita la discusión teológica.La CDSP no sólo ofrece el curso, es también miembro de la IAF.El curso se centra en el desarrollo de destrezas, de herramientas y de capacidades teóricas y reflexivas para la organización comunitaria en torno a múltiples asuntos en el contexto del ministerio. Los líderes de la IAF proporcionan el adiestramiento práctico básico y los profesores de la CDSP dirigen las reflexiones teológicas.Jennifer Snow, directora del [programa] de aprendizaje extendido de la CDSP y profesora auxiliar de teología práctica, moderó las reflexiones teológicas durante el adiestramiento de la IAF del año pasado. Foto/CDSP.Jennifer Snow, directora del [programa] de aprendizaje extendido de la CDSP y profesora auxiliar de teología práctica, moderó las reflexiones teológicas durante el último adiestramiento de la IAF. Los seminaristas participan diariamente en una reflexión teológica. Escriben ensayos antes y después del adiestramiento y tienen la obligación de leer artículos y libros que les han sido asignados, entre ellos Bienaventurados los organizados:democracia popular en Estados Unidos [Blessed Are the Organized: Grassroots Democracy in America] de Jeffrey Stout.En el primer ensayo, basado en las lecturas, los seminaristas reflexionaron sobre las relaciones entre la organización comunitaria de amplia base y un liderazgo fiel. La mayoría de los seminaristas dicen que “trabajar en pro de la justicia social es importante, por consiguiente, la organización comunitaria es importante”, sin darse cuenta de que mezclan ambas cosas, dijo Snow.“La organización comunitaria es una estrategia para trabajar en pro de la justicia”, dijo ella, y que los estudiantes hagan la distinción es una de las aspiraciones del curso. “Deberían ser capaces de darse cuenta y de expresar el porqué esto, como estrategia, contiene un mandato bíblico y teológico para las comunidades religiosas, no que sea la misma cosa”.Hay que hacer una distinción importante: la organización comunitaria es una estrategia específica que surge de un contexto específico y de necesidades específicas, dijo Snow.“Si uno se pone a pensar, ‘tengo que trabajar por la justicia porque el libro de Miqueas me lo dice, y Jesús me lo dice y, por tanto, tengo que llevar a cabo una organización comunitaria’, eso, a la postre, no resulta muy convincente”, explicó ella. “Porque la organización comunitaria es una estrategia específica no sólo respecto a trabajar por la justicia, sino respecto a abordar el poder de una manera relacional, en oposición a la manera del ‘poder impuesto’”.Como resulta obvio, es decisivo cambiar la percepción que la gente tiene del poder.“Conlleva pensar de manera diferente acerca del poder: crear relaciones con las personas, invitar a las personas a compartir el poder con usted como líder. Es una estrategia muy específica respecto a intentar alcanzar una sociedad más justa en nuestro contexto particular”, dijo Snow.Entender y abrazar el poder como una fuerza positiva puede ser al principio un proceso desestabilizador.“La mayoría de nosotros tiene una connotación negativa del poder porque siempre hemos estado en el extremo de los perdedores y siempre hemos sido víctimas de abusos”, dijo Eng, añadiendo que el poder no es algo naturalmente malo.“El poder es realmente algo muy bueno. Uno no puede hacer nada sin poder”, afirmó. “A partir de la tradición cristiana, toda la Biblia está llena de ejemplos de un Dios poderoso que interviene a través de personas poderosas que dudan de ejercer su poder. Luego, en gran medida, se trata de retornar a la tradición cristiana.“Parte de ella es ayudar a las personas a recobrar eso, la noción de que el poder que resucitó a Cristo de los muertos está dentro de uno: recobrarlo, reconocerlo y no dejar que te intimide. Pero hemos visto demasiados abusos de poder, y lo hemos experimentado, luego tiene sentido que la gente lo evite”.La Rda. Susanna Singer, profesora asociada de Desarrollo Ministerial y directora del Programa Doctoral de Ministerio, ayudó a rehacer el currículo de la Maestría en Teología para incluir un adiestramiento en organización comunitaria. Foto/CDSP.El punto de vista de Sarah Thomas acerca del poder cambió inmediatamente.“Desde el primer día, nos hacen ver cuán a menudo nosotros —especialmente las mujeres— cedemos el poder desde el momento en que abrimos la boca”, escribió ella en un email a ENS. “Me alentaron a recobrar mi poder y hablar sin excusas. Esta fue una lección importante para mí como futura líder. Aprendí a entablar las relaciones una por una, escuchando atentamente, permitiendo que mi curiosidad me guiara y haciendo las preguntas oportunas”.“He llegado a ser más audaz y más receptiva”, dijo Thomas, que vive en Santa Bárbara y que toma cursos por Internet y pasa cuatro semanas al año en el campus.Fundada en 1893 para preparar clérigos para el ministerio en el Oeste [de EE.UU.], la CDSP es miembro fundadora de la Unión Teológica de Postgrado (GTU, por su sigla en inglés). Es uno de los siete seminarios del nordeste de Berkeley a sólo unas cuadras del campus de la Universidad de California, con centros judío, hindú, musulmán, ortodoxo, swedenborgiano y de varias denominaciones evangélicas. El Seminario Teológico de San Francisco, escuela que pertenece a la GTU, se encuentra en el vecino San Anselmo, en el condado de Marín.Es en este contexto, ecuménico, interreligioso y secular que los seminaristas comparten, durante el curso, con rabinos, empresarios, estudiantes y otras personas.“La mezcla de perspectivas y opiniones era realmente diversa, de manera que resultaba realmente educativo, estar allí con alguien que había estado dedicado a los negocios toda su vida. Un director ejecutivo jubilado tiene una perspectiva muy diferente a la mía”, dijo Aaron Klinefelter, seminarista de la Diócesis de Ohio Sudoriental [o del Sudeste].Klinefelter, que ahora cursa el segundo año, se matriculó en el seminario a sabiendas de que él tendría que hacer algo más que dirigir una parroquia, que de él se esperaba que participara en la vida pública y comunitaria.“En verdad sabía que me metía en esto”, dijo durante una entrevista con ENS en Brewed Awakening, una cafetería que queda al pie de la cuesta del seminario, añadiendo que esta manera de pensar es aún algo de cierta manera nuevo en la Iglesia Episcopal. “No estoy seguro por qué es algo nuevo que la gente se dé cuenta de que los miembros han abandonado el edificio”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Theological Education Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ La CDSP prepara a los seminaristas para la vida pública Añaden adiestramiento en organización comunitaria a su currículo básico Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Por Lynette WilsonPosted Sep 14, 2016 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more