Bede names Butcher as new managing director

first_img Bede names Butcher as new managing director People AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: People Strategy 20th June 2018 | By contenteditor Bede Gaming has appointed Alex Butcher, a founder of the company, as its new managing director. Butcher, previously chief technology officer at the business, assumes control of the leadership team at Bede and will oversee the firm’s ongoing development and growth plans. The move comes after co-founders Michael Brady and Dan Smyth opted to take on more strategic roles at board level following the sale of Intellectual Property & Software Ltd and Rocket X. “Bede’s initial growth phase, where we built the team into a 160 strong workforce and conducted the largest migration in the history of the industry, has provided a firm foundation for growth,” Butcher said. “Our products and team are tried and tested, forging great potential for expansion into new markets. “My primary concern will be to ensure we preserve the fantastic culture that lies at the heart of what makes Bede unique.” Co-founder Brady added: “We’re absolutely delighted that Alex has accepted this position; his laser-like focus and experience in the industry make him the ideal person for the role. “We are confident that he will lead Bede into its next stage of growth with clarity and integrity.”Related article: Bede signs content deal with Pragmatic Playcenter_img Bede Gaming has appointed Alex Butcher, a founder of the company, as its new managing director Tags: Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

William Hill eyes Iowa launch with Prairie Meadows deal

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Sports betting William Hill has entered into a new partnership with Prairie Meadows Racetrack & Casino in Iowa in anticipation of the state passing laws to legalise sports betting.The bookmaker will serve as the casino’s official sportsbook operator, subject to the passage of regulations in the state. William Hill will operate an 8,600 square foot sportsbook within the casino, near its existing racing centre. The facility will feature video wall technology for viewing sporting events and live betting odds, in addition to a new bar area. However, work on the sportsbook will not begin until Iowa moves to regulate sports betting, with both William Hill and Prairie Meadows hopeful that legislation will pass in 2019. “We are excited about the prospect of sports betting in Iowa and are thrilled to partner with Prairie Meadows to be ready for the day when sports betting is legal in the state,” William Hill US CEO Joe Asher said. Brad Rhines, senior vice-president and chief strategic officer at Prairie Meadows, added: “Once the legislative process is complete, this innovative partnership will provide many fun and unique sports betting options for our guests.” Last year, Republican Jake Highfill introduced a bill to legalise sports betting at casinos and racetracks in the state, pending a ruling by the US Supreme Court on PASPA. This ruling eventually came in mid-May, with the Supreme Court opting to repeal PASPA and allow states across the US to begin legalising sports betting. However, Iowa’s legislature had already adjourned without passing Bill HF2448 and the state was forced to wait until the next session. This year’s session began on January 14 and bills can be submitted to the Legislative Services Agency from February 15. HF2448 would have allowed betting on both professional and collegiate sports in person and via electronic platforms, with casino sports betting licences priced at $25,000 (£19,400/€22,000), plus a $15,000 renewal fee each year. Licensees would also face a tax of 22% on gross annual sports betting revenue. William Hill had already positioned itself for expansion into Iowa and a number of other states when it struck a wide-ranging partnership with Eldorado Resorts in September last year. The bookmaker agreed to serve as the Eldorado’s exclusive partner in the provision of digital and land-based sports betting services as well as online gaming. At the time, the two companies named Iowa as one of several markets covered by the market access agreement.Image: Max Pixel Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter William Hill eyes Iowa launch with Prairie Meadows deal William Hill has entered into a new partnership with Prairie Meadows Racetrack & Casino in Iowa in anticipation of the state passing laws to legalise sports bettingcenter_img Email Address Regions: US Iowa Topics: Sports betting 17th January 2019 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

Sports betting and online casino drive Danish revenue growth in 2018

first_img Regions: Europe Nordics Denmark Increased consumer spending across sports betting and online casino helped to push gross gaming revenue in Denmark up 5.7% year-on-year to DKK9.74bn (£1.13bn/€1.30bn/$1.46bn) in 2018, according to official figures published by the Danish Gambling Authority (Spillemyndigheden).The 2018 total is up by DKK520m on DKK9.22bn reported in the previous year, as the Danish market was boosted by the 2018 Fifa World Cup, which took place from June 14 to July 15 last year.Gross gaming revenue from sports betting amounted to DKK2.53bn last year, up from DKK2.33bn in 2017, and is representative of 26% of total revenue for the year. Sports betting revenue was at its highest in the World Cup months, with June revenue at DKK245m and July DKK246m.Online casino revenue also increased by 19.5% from DKK1.81bn to DKK2.16bn, with this form of gambling responsible for 22% of the whole regulated market in 2018.However, online casino was boosted last year following the liberalisation of online bingo in January 2018, with this now accounting towards total online revenue for the year.Lotteries, including charity lottery games, remain the highest source of gambling income in Denmark and represent 31% of the country’s market. Revenue for this sector amounted to DKK2.30bn last year, up 6.6% from DKK3.11bn in 2017. Lotto games such as Joker and EuroJackpot accounted for most of the revenue in this sector (DKK2.33bn), while class lotteries placed some way behind in second on DKK413m in revenue. Scratch cards contributed DKK248m in revenue, while keno generated DKK£31m.Elsewhere, Spillemyndigheden noted a year-on-year decline in land-based casino revenue last year, with this figure dropping 5.8% from DKK375m to DKK354m, accounting for just 4% of the overall market.Gaming machine revenue was also down 5.4% year-on-year to DKK1.41bn for the year, representing 14% of Denmark’s gambling market. Spillemyndigheden estimates that there are around 25,000 gaming machines current active across the country.The increase in online gaming activities, in addition to the decline in land-based revenue, means online is now responsible for 54.5% of all gambling revenue in Denmark, compared to 51.5% in 2017.Mobile was the platform of choice for online gaming customers in all but one of the quarters in the past year. Desktop placed just ahead of mobile in Q1 in terms of revenue take, but mobile was higher in the following three quarters. By Q4, mobile held 52.4% of the online market, compared to 49.2% in Q1.Meanwhile, Spillemyndigheden has reported an increase in average weekly gambling spend by consumers over the age of 18, with this figure climbing 6.5% from DKK38.50 in 2017 to DKK41.00 last year. Gambling was most popular with consumers aged between 26 and 35. In terms of protection efforts for players, last year saw more consumers sign up to the ROFUS self-exclusion list, a scheme that allows players to take themselves out of both online gaming and land-based casinos.A total of 17,355 people had registered by the end of 2018, up 35% on the previous year. Of this amount, 11,940, or 69%, have opted for permanent exclusion from gambling in the country.Spillemyndigheden has been aiming to enhance protection measures in 2019, with the regulator successfully petitioning the country’s telecommunications providers to block access to 25 unlicensed gaming websites.The order from Spillemyndigheden was upheld by the Copenhagen City Court, with internet service providers now required to block Danish consumers from accessing 10 igaming sites and 15 skin betting sites.Meanwhile, a new code of conduct for gaming operators active in Denmark was published last month, with the aim of strengthening consumer protection and lowering the risk of gambling addiction in the country.Due to come into force on July 1, 2019, the code aims to set limits and offer tools that go beyond regulatory requirements to help protect consumers.Danish Online Gaming Association developed the code in partnership with the country’s slot machine operator association Dansk Automat Brancheforening, Danish casino operator body Dansk Kasinoforening and the Aarhus-based Royal Casino. Also involved in the creation of the code were lottery operators Danske Lotteri Spil, Klasselotteriet, Landbrugslotteriet and Varelotteriet.Click here to read more about the fourth quarter in the country on the Denmark iGaming Dashboard.Image: Bill Smith Casino & games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Increased consumer spending across sports betting and online casino helped push gross gaming revenue in Denmark up 5.7% year-on-year to DKK9.74bn (£1.13bn/€1.30bn/$1.46bn) in 2018, according to figures released by the Danish Gambling Authority (Spillemyndigheden). Sports betting and online casino drive Danish revenue growth in 2018 Topics: Casino & games Finance Lottery Sports betting Tags: Mobile Online Gambling 12th April 2019 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

ESSA rebrands as International Betting Integrity Association

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address ESSA rebrands as International Betting Integrity Association 4th June 2019 | By contenteditor Sports betting integrity monitoring body ESSA has rebranded as the International Betting Integrity Association. It has also revealed a sharp decline in suspicious betting alerts generated by tennis over the first quarter of 2019, with the total number of alerts across all sports down 26% year-on-year. Regions: Africa Europe US Legal & compliance Sports betting integrity monitoring body ESSA has rebranded as the International Betting Integrity Association.The name change aims to highlight the operator-funded association’s increasingly international focus, especially the role it plays in raising awareness of betting-related integrity issues worldwide.“The new name communicates who we are, what we do and where we want to be,” International Betting Integrity Association secretary general Khalid Ali explained.“The association has been active across six continents in recent years, with almost half of our alerts coming from outside of Europe,” he said. “This activity will only increase as gambling markets around the world continue to open up to regulation.”“The debate is global and our strategic focus must evolve in line with that.”The association’s non-executive chairman, and head of global trading for Betway, Jon Russell added: “Our members represent a sizeable part of the worldwide regulated betting market and their business strategies reflect global ambitions.“Integrity has become a key regulatory issue in that market debate, with membership of a monitoring body a licensing requirement in some cases,’ he said. “Betting and integrity are now inseparable and I encourage all responsible operators to join us and take advantage of the multifaceted business benefits membership brings.”News of the rebrand coincided with the release of its integrity monitoring figures for the first quarter of 2019. The association’s operators, comprising more than 50 sportsbook brands, feed reports of suspicious activity into its monitoring platform, allowing it to send alerts to its members, sports governing bodies, regulators and law enforcement officials.The first three months of 2019 saw a significant drop in the number of suspicious betting alerts, which fell 26% year-on-year to 37. Alert numbers also declined 55% from the fourth quarter of 2019.This was largely down to a decrease in alerts generated on tennis, which has traditionally seen the highest level of suspicious activity. However, the 17 alerts for the sport represented a 37% year-on-year, and 69% quarter-on-quarter, decline. The 17 alerts was the lowest quarterly total for tennis since Q1, 2017.The bulk of tennis alerts (eight) were generated in Europe, followed by five from Asia, one from Africa and three from North America. Europe, where many of the association’s member operators are headquartered, accounted for 25 of the quarter’s 37 alerts, far ahead of second-placed Asia with seven.While the number of alerts for tennis declined sharply, the sport remains by far the source of most suspicious betting activity. Football, with seven alerts – all from Europe – came in second followed by basketball and badminton, with three apiece. Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Strategy Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shopslast_img read more

Sweden’s ATG joins International Betting Integrity Association

first_img AB Trav och Galopp (ATG) the market-leading operator in the early months of Sweden’s regulated igaming market, has joined the recently rebranded International Betting Integrity Association (IBIA).ATG joins after launching its first sportsbook when the Swedish market opened on January 1, 2019, helping its Q1 turnover reach SEK1.07bn (£89.6m/€100.4m/$113.5m).
It becomes the first new member to join the body, which monitors global betting patterns for evidence of suspicious activity, since it was renamed the International Betting Integrity Association on June 4. Previously the association was known as ESSA (Sports Betting Integrity).“I am delighted to welcome one of the leading brands from the newly opened Swedish market to the association,” the association’s secretary general Khalid Ali said.“ATG joins other responsible and committed sports betting operators intent on working collectively to protect their businesses from corruption.”ATG chief security and quality officer Magnus Lunner said protecting its product, consumers and sporting events from betting-related corruption was “a foremost business consideration” for the operator.“Joining the International Betting Integrity Association, a globally recognised body and leader in its field, is a natural extension of that core aim,” Lunner explained. “ATG is committed to upholding the highest values of integrity and to working with our partners in the association to ensure the safest possible betting environment.”Last week the IBIA, which monitors betting activity across almost 50 brands, also revealed a 26% year-on-year decline in the number of suspicious activity alerts generated by members in the first quarter of 2019. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: Europe Nordics Sweden AB Trav och Galopp (ATG) the market-leading operator in the early months of Sweden’s regulated igaming market, has joined the recently rebranded International Betting Integrity Association (IBIA). Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Horse racing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Race Track and Racino Sweden’s ATG joins International Betting Integrity Association 11th June 2019 | By contenteditor Horse racing Email Addresslast_img read more

Optimove iGaming Pulse – November 2019

first_imgCasino & games Deep into autumn, is the industry gearing towards hibernation or holiday celebration? Optimove’s iGaming Pulse gives a peek into the industry and its various aspects. What can operators learn from November’s performance in sports and casino?Sports In sports, the average deposit amount decreased by 3% year-over-year, and increased by 3% month-over-month.The number of monthly deposits increased by 10% from the prior year to to 8.5, with a very slight decrease of 1% from October (8.6 to 8.5).Conversion rates increased by 5% sequentially, still showing an 8% decrease from November 2018, and holding at 46%.Retention rate increased slightly year-on-year (up 2%) and held steady month-on-month for the past four months of the of-season.The new retention rate increased 5% from 2018, and decreased 5% from October.Casino In casino, the average deposit amount decreased by 3%, (or €1 in actual currency), both sequentially and from the prior year, and holds at €35. Generally, last year’s trend is very steady increases and slight decreases between €35 and €38.Monthly deposits show a very slight decrease of 1% month-over-month, but an annual increase of 5%, and holds at 8.2.Mobile bet rate is still on the rise with an overall increasing trend showing an 18% year-on-year and 2% month-on-month jump. Similarly, conversion rate is up by 23%, though down 3% from October 2019.Activity Days Activity days increased by 2% from the prior year, and decreased by 3% month-over-month.Black Friday Close-up This month we’re taking a closer look at a phenomenon rather than a KPI, but paying attention to it could very well significantly increase your KPIs. We’re referring to Black Friday, which despite being perceived as a retail event, is actually showing great results for gaming operators.Research by Optimove shows that casino and sports operators who ran Black Friday Campaigns in 2018 won the jackpot in many KPIs. For example, the number of players how made a deposit following a Black Friday campaign was 37% higher than an average Friday in 2018.  The number of deposits themselves was 36% higher than the average Friday, and the deposit amount was 29% higher compared to the average Friday in 2018.Casino operators who ran a Black Friday campaign enjoyed 13% increase in total casino bet amounts and the number of players was 28% higher on average compared to the Friday average in 2018. The number of players who responded to Black Friday campaigns was 7% higher compared to other campaigns. So, does Black Friday put gaming operators in the ‘black’? You bet it does!About iGaming Pulse: iGaming Pulse is an industry benchmark tool for the gaming sector. iGaming Pulse enables gaming operators to accurately assess their overall performance against industry-wide key performance indicators.Its figures are updated on a monthly basis. It enables gaming operators to gain a clearer understanding of how their KPIs compare against the rest of the industry, broken down by geography and game type. This type of data, which is made publicly available for the first time, provides operators with the ability to conduct comparative analysis and derive insight into how their performance compares with industry averages.iGaming Pulse comprises of data collected from over 200 online casinos and sports betting companies, including industry giants and boutique operators, providing an accurate, statistically significant sample of the industry. Access to this information is vital for operators that are limited to only their own data. Optimove’s iGaming Pulse is now fully accessible, ensuring operators will have a clearer overview of how they compare to the industry. 4th December 2019 | By contenteditor Optimove iGaming Pulse – November 2019 Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Deep into autumn, is the industry gearing towards hibernation or holiday celebration? Optimove’s iGaming Pulse gives a peek into the industry and its various aspects. What can operators learn from November’s performance in sports and casino? AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Casino & games Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Email Addresslast_img read more

Sweden: Europe’s accidental black market

first_img Email Address Germany recently approved regulations to expand its online gambling market, but by setting out such restrictive operating conditions, it risks making the same mistakes as Sweden, writes BonusFinder.com managing director Fintan Costello.On 12 March, German lawmakers approved regulations to legalise online poker and casino from 1 July 2021. But in doing so they risk sending huge numbers of players to unlicensed sites that offer no restrictions compared with the punitive legislative measures they are willing to endorse: Slots are subject to a €1 per spin stake limit, with no autoplay and no jackpots, and must be offered separately to table games.They didn’t get to this decision alone. On 1 January 2019, close neighbour Sweden accidentally created a vast black market of its own, one that is now spiralling out of control. Without urgent action Germany has the potential to be far worse.The Nordic markets were once a key driver of European dot.com growth, but then Sweden decided to regulate. Everything seemed rosy at first, with operators and suppliers primed with pre-approved licences and ready-to-go compliance strategies. However, reality soon began to bite when a series of factors collided to hamper the market from day one: rising costs due to tax and regulation, local monopolies allowed to expand products and marketing measures restricting brands to only offering a single first-time welcome bonus… and severely punished if they stepped out of line.As Gustaf Hoffstedt, from Sweden’s online gambling trade body BOS, argued in January this year, there is strong evidence pointing towards thousands of players “leaking” through the government’s ‘channelisation’ strategy and into the hands of unlicensed, black-market operators.Even more worrying is that this appears to be getting worse with Ardalan Shekarabi, Sweden’s Minister of Social Security and a key player in drafting the country’s online gambling framework, unwilling to clamp down on those flouting the rules outside the legal framework. Instead he is pressing ahead with enforcing tougher sanctions, not to mention advertising and marketing restrictions.Figures vary but according to official Swedish Gaming Authority numbers, 91% of gambling is carried out by licensed operators in a market worth more than €1.2bn. In November 2019, H2 Gambling Capital estimated channelisation to be at approximately 86%, but based on our data that trend has continued, and we estimate the proportion of Swedish players using illegal black-market casinos to be closer to 70%.Our numbers show this problem is deepening with potentially vulnerable players left unprotected and open to market abuse. Using publicly available data from Google Trends we found huge growth in searches taking place in Sweden for a basket of terms including ‘casino utan licens’ (unlicensed casino), when compared to ‘Online Casino’, reinforcing the theory that aggressive restrictions for licensed operators are driving players to search for, and convert to, playing on unlicensed brands.Instead of misguidedly declaring phase one of Swedish legislation as a “success”, regulators should be focusing on the 30% and rising proportion of players that are searching for these terms.More concerning is that newly regulating markets such as Germany appear to be ignoring their mistakes. There is no regulated market on earth that is proposing such damaging rules, and we would urge them to take heed of Sweden’s rapid plunge toward encouraging unlicensed activity.At BonusFinder we aim to give players more choice, presenting them with all the options before they commit to gambling on specific sites. Our aim is to help people “play with more” in a safe environment. Our core principles are built on a common sense approach to regulation that involve honest and open conversations between regulators, operators, affiliates and players.Despite all the warning signs, advice and abysmal quarterly results from major licensees, Sweden, and now Germany, are ignoring the evidence and ultimately forcing players down a dangerous route.Open and robust conversations about the reality of what players want and balancing the need to protect the most vulnerable, while also preserving a profitable industry, is vital. However, putting damaging restrictions in place will ultimately always fail with black-market options just a click away for consumers.Fintan Costello is Managing Director of BonusFinder.com an Amsterdam-based start-up focused on helping people ‘Play With More’. Be it buying, selling, leading, consulting, building (and breaking) speaking and writing, Fintan has covered almost everything in the industry in the last 12 years. He is now focused on searching the world for the best casino bonuses, running ultra marathons and playing Mario Kart with his son. Legal & compliance Germany recently approved regulations to expand its online gambling market, but by setting out such restrictive operating conditions, it risks making the same mistakes as Sweden, writes BonusFinder.com managing director Fintan Costello. Sweden: Europe’s accidental black market AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 25th March 2020 | By contenteditor Tags: Online Gambling Regions: Europe Central and Eastern Europe Nordics Germany Sweden Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Legal & compliance Strategylast_img read more

FanDuel signs with TV service SportsGrid

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter FanDuel Group has become the official partner of North American 24-hour sports betting network SportsGrid.The multi-year agreement grants FanDuel exclusive category access to digital distribution, broadcast, syndication, and radio assets across SportsGrid’s gaming and lifestyle network, which is available via on demand TV services such as Roku and XUMO.As the exclusive sportsbook, casino, racing and fantasy sports partner of SportsGrid, FanDuel will collaborate on over 50 hours of original video and audio content each month. SportsGrid will also exclusively promote and feature FanDuel odds, data, and promotions in both branded and unbranded shows. “We’re excited to provide our loyal fantasy and sports betting customers with more ways to learn, play and win through this exclusive partnership with SportsGrid,” said Matt King, chief executive of FanDuel.Read the full story on iGB North America. Marketing & affiliates Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Marketing & affiliates Sports betting FanDuel Group has become the official partner of North American 24-hour sports betting network SportsGrid.center_img Regions: US Email Address FanDuel signs with TV service SportsGrid 24th June 2020 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

Tabcorp to appeal Au$71.0m NSW tax bill

first_img Tabcorp to appeal Au$71.0m NSW tax bill Topics: Finance Legal Tabcorp said it would appeal the amended amount, saying on the balance of probability that the deductions are allowable. The operator added that it made this decision after taking external professional advice. However, the amended assessment amounted to $71.0m, which includes $9.0m in penalty interest imposed by the Australian Taxation Office. This will be reported as a significant item as part of Tabcorp’s first half results for its 2021 financial year. Australian gambling operator Tabcorp has pledged to appeal an AU$71.0m tax bill, related to fees incurred by the legacy Tatts Group business in 2016. Regions: Oceania Australia Tags: Tabcorp Tatts Group November also saw Tabcorp reject reports in the Australian media that it could be subject to a takeover bid, in a proposal involving private equity firms and fronted by betting pioneer Matthew Tripp. 7th December 2020 | By Robert Fletcher The announcement comes after Tabcorp was last month ordered to pay more than $30,000 in fines and costs after it was ruled to have breached advertising rules in New South Wales NSW.center_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter In its financial statement posted in June this year, Tabcorp disclosed a contingent liability in relation to the matter of AU$62m (£34.5m/€37.9m/US$45.9m) after tax. A number of private equity firms were said to have approached Matthew Tripp with the aim of launching a takeover bid, one of which supposedly tabled a fee of $9.0bn to acquire the entire Tabcorp business, an another considering a $3.0bn bid for Tabcorp’s TAB betting division. Tabcorp said the case is in relation to tax on fees incurred by Tatts Group – which it acquired in December 2017 – for the monitoring of gaming machines in New South Wales. An investigation by Liquor & Gaming NSW found that a former Tabcorp betting account holder received a gambling advert offering bonus bets from Tabcorp on his Instagram account via Instagram Stories, which was in breach of state law. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Legal Email Addresslast_img read more

GC again reminds industry of responsibilities under lockdown

first_imgThe Commission also urged operators to “avoid any temptation to exploit the current situation for marketing purposes and be very cautious when seeking to cross-sell products”. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The British Gambling Commission has urged “extra operator vigilance” in Great Britain’s latest novel coronavirus (covid-19) lockdown and said it expects operators to again follow the guidance issued in March 2020. This included instructions to identify customers who may be at risk of harm, interacting with these customers and understanding the impact of this interaction. In addition, operators were told to review their thresholds for interaction and ensure they were appropriate given the changed financial circumstances many players would be facing. As a result, it said it expected operators to follow the initial lockdown guidance. It added that the fact that elite sport will continue means customers will have more betting options than in the previous lockdown. In a letter from chief executive Neil McArthur (pictured), the regulator said that more caution was required as people will be spending more time at home, and many may be “isolated and vulnerable”. Some players may gamble more, or for the first time, it noted. GC again reminds industry of responsibilities under lockdown Tags: Covid-19 Gambling Commission Neil McArthur The regulator will continue to publish reports based on operator data to show how gambling activity has changed under lockdown. For the new lockdown, the Commission has told operators to not just make these direct interactions, but also to interact more generally through methods such as safer gambling emails. 12th January 2021 | By Daniel O’Boyle It added that operators must take “particular care” when onboarding new customers, and said decisions related to affordability checks for these customers must “reflect the environment we are in”. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Social responsibility Topics: Social responsibility CSR Problem gambling Responsible gambling Regions: UK & Ireland The guidance also called for “ processes that ensure the continual monitoring of your customer base”, as well as an end to reverse withdrawals. Email Addresslast_img read more