Photo library: Buildings and structures 11

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Buildings & Structures contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Sutherland, Northern Cape province: The Sutherland Observatory is home to the world’s largest telescope, the Southern African Large Telescope, or SALT. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Sutherland, Northern Cape province: The Sutherland Observatory is home to the world’s largest telescope, the Southern African Large Telescope, or SALT. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Sutherland, Northern Cape province: The Sutherland Observatory is home to the world’s largest telescope, the Southern African Large Telescope, or SALT. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com  » Download high-res image Sutherland, Northern Cape province: The Sutherland Observatory is home to the world’s largest telescope, the Southern African Large Telescope, or SALT. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Sutherland, Northern Cape province: The Sutherland Observatory is home to the world’s largest telescope, the Southern African Large Telescope, or SALT. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Victoria West, Northern Cape province: Old buildings in the town have been restored and attract visitors to the area. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Victoria West, Northern Cape province: Old buildings in the town have been restored and attract visitors to the area. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Victoria West, Northern Cape province: Old buildings in the town have been restored and attract visitors to the area.Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Victoria West, Northern Cape province: Old buildings in the town have been restored and attract visitors to the area. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res imageBUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES 11: {loadposition bd}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

Improving yields, despite lower commodity prices

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest At the recent Conklin’s Pro Grower day, world record soybean producer Kip Cullers shared how to improve yields yet this year, even at these lower commodity prices.last_img

Managing phosphorus for yield and reduced edge of field losses

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA, Ohio State University ExtensionA new factsheet highlights eight steps to reducing edge of field P losses while maintain soils for increase crop production. The Phosphorus Nutrient Management for Yield and Reduced P Loss at Edge of Field-AGF-509 (https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/agf-509) highlight practices that can be used to reduce edge of field losses of P. There are eight field specific steps to considered.Control erosionIdentify surface inlets to tile and use appropriate practices to reduce surface lossesConsider ground and weather conditions prior to application of fertilizer and manureTake a representative soil testUse soil test as screening tool to meet crop production and water quality goalsWith a soil test P value of 40 PPM Mehlich III or less, you can reduce risk of crop yield losses with nutrient application for crop yield.• A soil test P value of 20 PPM defines the critical level. At 20 PPM or less, the risk of yield loss increases. Annual in-season P nutrient application recommended. Recommendations to build soil test P value to critical level are available.• The maintenance STP range is 20 to 40 PPM. The recommended rate of P is equal to P removed in harvested crop. Annual application is not required. Risk of yield loss is low with flexibility to delay application one (or more) growing seasons, if needed. The greatest risk for event P losses occur when nutrient application is followed by runoff-producing rainfall. Use the following steps to reduce P loss risk at application for water quality.• Use an agronomic rate of no more than two years’ worth crop removal as recommended in the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations. • Time fertilizer applications so predicted rainfall 12 hours after application is less than a 50% chance of more than 1 inch of rainfall. • Time organic nutrient applications so predicted rainfall 24 hours after application is less than a 50% chance of more than 0.5 inches of rainfall. • Subsurface placement reduces losses over surface application. 7.  With a soil test P value above 40 PPM Mehlich III, response to fertilizer is highly unlikely for improving crop yields.• Do not apply additional fertilizer due to lack of economic return. • Organic applications should be determined using P content from testing the organic source and not exceed P crop removal rate for the next two (and no more than three) crops in the rotation. • Consider in-crop application to a nitrogen-using crop to reduce purchased N, maximizing economic return to organic application. • Where in-crop application is not used, incorporate organic nutrients.In terms of water quality, the risk of P loss increases with STP values over 40 PPM, with greater risk after 150 PPM. Do not apply additional fertilizer due to lack of economic return and do not make organic applications when STP is greater than 150 PPM. Follow NRCS 590 site and rate criteria between 40 to 150 PPM. Time organic applications so predicted rainfall 24 hours after application is less than a 50 percent chance of more than 0.5 inches of rainfall. Use the Ohio P risk index, field scale hydrology/water quality models, or monitoring to evaluate site risk for P losses and need for further site BMPs. See step 8. 8. BMPs for high risk P loss sites: Monitor fields for P loss using the Ohio P risk index and field scale hydrologic and water quality models. For sites with predicted high P losses, consider one or more of the following water management practices based on fitness and cost effectiveness for field site:• Production practices that increase soil organic matter to retain water on site • Drainage Water Management (NRCS 554) • Nutrient removal wetlands (NRCS 656) • P Precipitating Filter • Saturated Buffer (NRCS 604) • In-field water storage or detention basins.last_img read more

The 5 Ways IoT Is About to Change Healthcare as We Know It

first_imgTrends Driving the Loyalty Marketing Industry Related Posts Frank Landman Follow the Puck The internet-of-things (IoT) is about to take over the healthcare industry. By the end of this year, there will be more than 23 billion connected devices, with that number set to grow to more than 75 billion by the end of 2025. While many of these devices will be used to toast your bread to the perfect level of doneness, or give your drone a full onboard GPS navigation system, the remainder are going to have vital roles to fill—and may even save lives.The healthcare industry as we know it is about to undergo an evolution, the likes of which we’ve never seen, and we’re all destined for better care because of it.The Most Important ChangesThese are some of the most important ways IoT could change healthcare for the better:1. Training. Doctors, nurses, and medical students will be equipped with advanced healthcare training devices, which can give them real-time feedback, and mimic patient symptoms. The sophistication and widespread availability of these devices will make it easier to train new medical professionals over vast distances, and may even be able to self-guide them toward a more complete education.2. Remote patient monitoring. IoT will also revolutionize remote patient monitoring, especially for patients who have medical devices to manage. For example, IoT could make it simpler and easier to check your blood sugar on a regular basis, or could tell you when your blood pressure is rising above normal. Connected devices could send this feedback, in real-time, to your primary care physician, who may be able to take intervening action faster than ever. When applied to patients at risk for heart attack or stroke, the benefits become even clearer.3. Preventative care. The least expensive and most effective way to get healthcare is gradually, during the times when you don’t think you need it. Preventative medicine is underrated and frequently neglected by people who don’t believe they need regular checkups. IoT could make those regular checkups more convenient, and could even make them a part of everyday life; imagine having a device that could proactively monitor your vitals, and tell you exactly when you need to seek further care.4. Workflow optimization. Medical professionals are also looking forward to IoT’s ability to control workflow optimization. This may not mean much to you as a patient, but ultimately, it’s going to result in better care. Nurses, doctors, and patients may all walk around with RFID bracelets, with a centralized system that indicates who’s supposed to be where and when. Doctors will see you faster, and there will be fewer opportunities for confusion.5. Inventory management. Though not the sexiest application, IoT will also be important in inventory management. Hospitals and doctor’s offices often contain controlled substances, medications, and other important equipment; using IoT tech can help keep track of all these important items, and ensure they aren’t being used for the wrong patient or falling into the wrong hands.The ObstaclesMany of these applications already have prototypes or early models in circulation, so what’s stopping IoT from truly taking off in healthcare?Pace. The healthcare industry isn’t well-known for its ability to adopt new technology quickly. In fact, your local hospital may still be using computers from the 90s. Slow adoption will prevent IoT from taking off as quickly as it otherwise could.Cost. New technology costs lots of money, which some hospitals won’t be willing to provide—especially with a constant stream of new, more cost-efficient generations on the horizon. Worse, hospitals that adopt this new technology may start charging even more exorbitant prices to make up the difference.Security. One of the biggest concerns is security. If you have a connected device controlling some important biological function in your body, and someone seizes control of it, you could be held hostage by a cybercriminal. Your personal data may also be at stake here.Training. Learning to use IoT devices ethically and appropriately is going to require weeks, if not months of new training for doctors, nurses, and other admin staff who are already overworked.Unfortunately, these obstacles have the power to hold back the growth of healthcare IoT for years to come. But as we figure them out, we’ll start to see the gradual introduction of devices, processes, and systems that can increase our lifespans and the quality of our care.center_img Frank is a freelance journalist who has worked in various editorial capacities for over 10 years. He covers trends in technology as they relate to business. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …last_img read more